2016 Deutscher Phantastik Preis Nominees

The shortlist for the 2016 Deutscher Phantastik Preis (DPP) has been announced. The award honors speculative fiction published for the first time in German language during the previous year. Winners are picked by a public vote hosted by the online magazine Phamtastik-News.de.

The final round of voting is open until July 17. The winners will be recognized at a ceremony on October 22 at BuchmesseCon in Frankfurt, Germany.

Bester deutschsprachiger Roman / Best novel in German language

  • Valerian Çaithoque: Amizaras 3 – Raphadona (Amizaras)
  • Tom Jacuba: Kalypto 1 – Die Herren der Wälder (Bastei-Lübbe)
  • Susanne Pavlovic: Feuerjäger 1 – Die Rückkehr der Kriegerin (Amrûn)
  • J. H. Praßl: Chroniken von Chaos und Ordnung 3 – Bargh Barrowson (Acabus)
  • Elisabeth Ruetz: Der Schattenkristall 3 – Das Blut der Wächterin (GS Publishing)
  • M. H. Steinmetz: Hell’s Abyss 1 – 666 (Papierverzierer)

Bestes deutschsprachiges Romandebüt / Best debut novel in German

  • Sandra Berger: Transformation am Feuersee (BookRix)
  • Faye Hell: Keine Menschenseele (Amrûn)
  • Maja Loewe: Die Augen des Iriden (Papierverzierer)
  • Luzia Pfyl: Cesario Aero – Kaiser der Lüfte (Ohneohren)
  • Mona Silver: Verlorener Stern (Sieben)

Bester internationaler Roman / Best international novel

  • Ben Aaronovitch: Peter Grant 5 – Fingerhut-Sommer (dtv) [Foxglove Summer]
  • Kevin J. Anderson: Resurrection Inc. (Papierverzierer) [Resurrection Inc.]
  • Terry Pratchett: Die Krone des Schäfers (Manhattan) [The Shepherd’s Crown]
  • Patrick Rothfuss: Die Musik der Stille (Klett-Cotta) [The Slow Regard of Silent Things]
  • Jonathan Stroud: Lockwood & Co 3 – Die raunende Maske (cbj) [The Whispering Skull]

Beste deutschsprachige Kurzgeschichte / Best German short story

  • Katharina Fiona Bode: „Erasmus Emmerich und der zinnoberrote Zinnsoldat“ (aus: Die dunkelbunten Farben des Steampunk [Art Skript Phantastik])
  • Georg Britzkow: „Gesang der Kröten“ (aus: Der schwarze Gott des Wahnsinns [Sarturia])
  • Anna-Katharina Höpflinger: „Selig sind die geistig Armen“ (aus: Verschlusssache [Ohneohren])
  • Oliver Plaschka: „Das öde Land“ (aus: Das öde Land [Low])
  • Carmen Weinand: „Der große Stefano“ (aus: Fleisch 3 [Eldur])

Beste Original-Anthologie/Kurzgeschichten-Sammlung / Best anthology/story collection

  • Die dunkelbunten Farben des Steampunk (Art Skript Phantastik)
  • Torsten Exter [Hg]: Zombie Zone Germany (Amrûn)
  • Ann-Kathrin Karschnick & Diana Kinne [Hg]: Die kleinen Köche (UBV)
  • Oliver Plaschka: Das öde Land (Low)
  • Ingrid Pointecker & Fabian Dombrowski [Hg]: Verschlusssache (Ohneohren)

Beste Serie / Best book series

  • Nicole Böhm: Die Chroniken der Seelenwächter (Greenlight Press)
  • Allan J. Stark: Asgaroon (Papierverzierer)
  • Andreas Suchanek: Heliosphere 2265 (Greenlight Press)
  • Perry Rhodan (VPM)
  • J. H. Praßl: Chroniken von Chaos und Ordnung (Acabus)

Bester Grafiker / Best graphic artist

  • Arndt Drechsler
  • Mark Freier
  • Alexander Kopainski
  • Timo Kümmel
  • Grit Richter

Bestes Sekundärwerk / Best work on secondary literature

  • Alex Jahnke & Clara Lina Wirz: Das große Steampanoptikum (Edition Roter Drache)
  • Geek! (Panini)
  • Michael Haitel & Hermann Ritter [Hg]: Magira – Jahrbuch zur Fantasy 2014 (Amrûn)
  • Multimania (Devil Inc)
  • Bettina Petrik & Stefanie Zurek: With Love, Mary Sue (iFuB) phantastisch! (Atlantis)

(Last year there was also a Best Website category, which does not appear in the 2016 list.)

Pixel Scroll 6/25/16 All My Kzins Remembered

(1) PHOTOS FROM THE LOCUS AWARDS.

File 770 was a Locus Award finalist in the magazine category and I did arm someone with an acceptance statement in case I unexpectedly won. It never occurred to me to dramatize my feelings about losing, however, I see First Novel nominee Sylvia Moreno-Garcia refused to admit defeat. (Or was that just her reaction to Nick Mamatas?)

My designated accepter, Suzle Tompkins, stands at the right of this photo.

(2) THUMB UP. Gary Westfahl delivers his verdict at Locus Online: “The Fogeys of July: A Review of Independence Day: Resurgence”. BEWARE SPOILERS.

Since I was recently complimented at a conference for writing “honest” film reviews, I feel obliged to begin this one by conveying my honest reaction to Independence Day: Resurgence: although I was bored and appalled by the original Independence Day (1996), and utterly baffled by its tremendous popularity, I somehow found its belated sequel to be surprisingly engaging, even moving, despite some obvious issues in its logic and plausibility. Perhaps this indicates that I am finally becoming senile, unable to distinguish between worthwhile entertainment and reprehensible trash; perhaps this is a sign of the times, so that a film modeled on a film that stood out in 1996 for its risible inanity and clumsy manipulativeness now seems, amidst scores of similar films, merely typical, or even a bit superior to its lamentable competitors. Perhaps, though, it is simply a better film than its precursor, the theory that merits some extended exploration.

(3) ONLINE COMICS. David Brin is back with “A look at Science Fiction webcomics: Part 3”.

Crowded Void, by Mike West offers one of the more unusual concepts. Finding Earth too crowded and people rather distasteful, Vincent Foxwell thought he could find peace when he took a job on a cargo vessel, hauling junk in space, with only an AI for company. Space turns out to be more crowded than he imagined…. when his spacecraft is swallowed by a massive space worm, where there is already an intestinal civilization of over a million humans and aliens, jockeying for position in the worm’s digestive cycle. He must find a way to escape… before digestion is complete. But first he must deal with the The Joint Intestinal Monarchy, which controls the worm, harvesting parts from spaceships. No end of good material for humor… a new theory of wormholes? Start at the beginning here.

(4) BANDERSNATCH. Charles de Lint reviewed Diana Pavlac Glyer’s Bandersnatch in the July/August Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Yes, there is a wonderful font of information about the Inklings, but it also provides one of the better guides to the collaborative process, including a chapter with the end about how to get the most out of a group set up in a style similar to that of the Inklings.  I think one of the best  pieces of advice she gives is the difference between “I don’t personally like this’ and ‘This isn’t any good’ in critiquing a manuscript.

To writers setting up a writing group, I recommend Bandersnatch wholeheartedly,  That said, those who simply love to read–especially those who particularly appreciate the work of Tolkien, Lewis, and Williams–will find much to enjoy as well.

(6) EAU DE MIDCHLORIAN. When you wear Star Wars Perfumes, the Force is with you….

The trilogy of futuristic “must have” perfumes transfers the essence of the Star Wars universe skillfully into a fascinating world of fragrances, which represent the best-known elements and characters from the saga.

The products are presented in a luxurious and lavish flacon which draws upon the symbolism of probably the most emblematic element of the movie – the lightsaber.

There’s Amidala, for women, and Jedi, and Empire for men.

AMIDALA inspired this fragrance through her royal elegance as well as by her strong, indomitable will. The elegant and sensual notes of vanilla, musk and patchouli are complemented by a fruity top note of apple and tangerine and merges into a sovereign seductive aura for any situation by day and by night; a floral perfume with oriental and powdery notes, which makes its wearer irresistible.

Should you want to smell like Darth Vader, spritz yourself liberally with this stuff —

EMPIRE covers you with an aura of masculinity and power. A scent that captures the dark side of the Force; mystical, formidable and superior. It starts with a sparkle of fruity notes from lime and apple. Powerful chords of amber, patchouli and tonka-bean characterize the powerful heart and base note that refine the composition. The result is a distinctive, oriental, seductive fragrance – perfect for the night, made for men which one better does not get in the way.

I just love that The Mary Sue kicks off its post about these perfumes with a GIF from the first Star Wars movie showing our heroes in the garbage bin and Han Solo demanding, “What an incredible smell you’ve discovered.”

(7) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • June 25, 1951 — On this day in 1951, CBS aired the first commercial color television network broadcast. At the time, no color TV sets were owned by the public. The broadcast was seen on color TV sets in public buildings. (Emphasis on commercial – there were other network broadcasts in color the previous year, 1950.)
  • June 25, 1982 — John Carpenter’s The Thing, seen for the first time on this day.

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY GIRL

  • June 25, 1925 — June Lockhart, whom some remember from Lassie, while fans remember her from Lost in Space.

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY BOY

  • June 25, 1903 – George Orwell

(10) MARK THIS DATE: Neil Gaiman will be on Late Night with Seth Meyers next Friday night, July 1.

(11) HARD TO WIN. Chuck Tingle had a good excuse for not getting a Locus Award.

(12) BREXIT DEBRIEFING. Camestros Felapton registered his disapproval of Brexit by refusing to art containing a notorious Leave supporter.

Not doing cat pictures because Timothy is still running around the house wearing a mop and pretending to be Boris Johnson whilst shouting “effinEurolosers” at squirrels.

(13) FREE SPEECH. The July Harper’s Magazine excerpted the brief the Language Creation Society filed in the Axanar lawsuit claiming that CBS and Paramount did not have copyright over the Klingon language.

Plaintiffs claim copyright over the entire Klingon language.  The notion is meqHutlh (‘lacking reason.’)  If this court commits this qab qech (“bad idea”), an entire body of thought will be extinguished.  Hoch jaghpu’Daj HoHbogh Suvwl’ ylvup-‘ (‘Pity the warrior who kills all his enemies.’)  By Plaintiffs’ account, everyone who translates something into Klingon, writes a poem in Klingon, gives a speech or presentation at a Klingon Language Institute meeting or Star Trek convention, or gives lessons on how to speak Klingon is a copyright infringer. Qam ghu’vam, loD!  (“This will not stand, man!”)  Plaintiffs’ argument that ‘a language is only useful if it can be used to communicate with people, and there are no Klingons with whom to communicate’ is an insulting assertion.  Many humans speak Klingon.  People get married in Klingon.  Linguist d’Armond Speers spent three years teaching his infant son how to speak Klingon. Speaking and writing in Klingon is not simply a matter of transposing words from a different language, either.  The Sesame Street theme-song lyric ‘Sunny day, chasing the clouds away’ translates into Klingon as jaj pen puQmo’, chaw’nIS je Jaj ‘ej Haw’raDchen, or ‘Day of the daytime star, the clouds are filled with dread and forced to flee.’  Klingon is not just a language, but a state of mind.

(14) TEMPLE GRANDIN. A Blank on Blank animation of an interview with Temple Grandin contains lots of food for thought for geeks and nerds. (Don’t be thrown off by the Squarespace ad about 4:30, because Grandin resume talking for another 90 seconds when it’s done.)

(15) RAINING ON A PARADE. Jesse Hudson, in a review of Alastair Reynolds’ Chasm City for Speculiction, compares its execution unfavorably with an Iain Banks standby.

This is important to note given the bifurcated storyline, and its intended effect. Seemingly an emulation of the narrative structure of Iain Banks Use of Weapons, Reynolds’ adherence to plot above character does not allow the big reveals to be very big. I will not spoil the story for those unable to put one and one (not even two and two) together, but suffice to say the underlying reality of the situation is telegraphed in the least subtle ways the length of the novel, emphasized by the lack of complete coherence at the character level. Where Banks’ story resolves itself in surprising fashion upon the final chapter, a surprise that feeds logically back through the entire book, I have doubts Chasm City does the same for the majority of readers—this coming from a person who is terrible at predicting endings

I’m not implying any defect in Hudson’s opinion of Reynolds’ book, but I have to say I saw the ending of Use of Weapons coming from a long way off. To me, Banks’ success was in delivering the expected “surprise” in an elegant way.

(16) TOM REAMY. Joachim Boaz reminds readers about a strong award contender, now forgot, Tom Reamy’s Blind Voices (1978), at Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations.

Tom Reamy’s Blind Voices (1978) was nominated for the Nebula, Hugo, and BFSA awards and came in second in Locus voting for best novel in 1979.  Posthumously released, Reamy died of a heart attack while writing in the fall of 1977 at 42.  His take on small town America transformed by the arrival of a traveling circus and its array of wonders will stay with you for years to come.  The science fiction elements (revealed more than halfway through the novel) interlace and add to the elegiac and constrained fantasy feel.  The specter of sexuality and violence spells cataclysm.

(17) OLD SCHOOL FAN. In a piece cleverly titled “Trexit”, Steve Davidson says “Get off Star Trek’s lawn!”

Alec Peters, you asked for it and you got it.  A set of fan work guidelines for the Star Trek universe that pretty much kills everything except maybe Lego animations. (Which are fine for what they are, but…)

I don’t personally do fanfic, fan films, fan art, etc., I’m sufficiently happy to stick with the originals, lament the lack of “more of the same”, and to spend some time dithering over whether or not I want to invest in the latest whatever released by the franchise holders.

But maybe that’s because I’m an old school fan with old school ideas about how one goes about engaging with someone else’s property….

(18) A LIZARD WITHOUT THUNDER. At Galactic Journey, The Traveler is falling out of love with one of the major prozines: “[June 25, 1961] The Twilight Years (July 1961 Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Like Victorian ladies’ hats, the dinosaurs became increasingly baroque until they were too ungainly to survive.

I worry that The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is heading in that direction.  I’m all for literary quality in my sf mags, but F&SF has been tilting so far in the purple direction that it is often all but unreadable.  I present Exhibit A: the July 1961 “All-Star” issue.

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

2016 Locus Awards

The winners of the 2016 Locus Awards were announced on June 25 in Seattle.

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • Ancillary Mercy, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • Uprooted, Naomi Novik (Del Rey)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • The Shepherd’s Crown, Terry Pratchett (Harper; Doubleday UK)

FIRST NOVEL

  • The Grace of Kings, Ken Liu (Saga)

NOVELLA

  • Slow Bullets, Alastair Reynolds (Tachyon)

NOVELETTE

  • ‘‘Black Dog’’, Neil Gaiman (Trigger Warning)

SHORT STORY

  • ‘‘Cat Pictures Please’’, Naomi Kritzer (Clarkesworld 1/15)

ANTHOLOGY

  • Old Venus, George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois, eds. (Bantam)

COLLECTION

  • Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances, Neil Gaiman (Morrow)

MAGAZINE

  • Asimov’s

PUBLISHER

  • Tor

EDITOR

  • David G. Hartwell

ARTIST

  • Michael Whelan

NON-FICTION

  • Letters to Tiptree, Alisa Krasnostein & Alexandra Pierce, eds. (Twelfth Planet)

ART BOOK

  • Julie Dillon, Julie Dillon’s Imagined Realms, Book 2: Earth and Sky (self-published)

 

Hallmark Rolls Out 2016 Ornaments

BLM_Firefighting_at_Pine_Mountain,_Oregon_(14186496134)

In California this year’s Christmas trees are still standing on hillsides in hundred degree heat, waiting for firefighting airplanes to cover them in season-appropriate red fire retardant.

Hallmark, on the other hand, believes midsummer is the perfect time to sell fans collectible tree ornaments. You can buy them beginning July 9.

Profit is always the “reason for the season,” and in 2016 Hallmark’s golden touch is symbolized by the Star Trek™ U.S.S. Enterprise™ 50th Anniversary Edition Musical Ornament. Only $32.95.

Based on the series’ pilot episode, this gold-hued Enterprise ornament lets you hear Captain Kirk’s monologue and the iconic music from the opening credits of the Star Trek TV series!

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However, the prize-winner for Clashing Most With The Holiday Spirit prize is Star Trek “The Man Trap” Kirk and Salt Monster Ornament With Sound” — which plays the horrific dialogue from this scene. (You can listen at the link.) Though wouldn’t George Clayton Johnson have been amused to see his script adapted as a tree ornament? I suspect so. Price $29.95.

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Nor has Hallmark fallen behind in exploiting that other huge science fiction franchise. Consider this Star Wars™: The Force Awakens™ Han Solo™ Ornament, highly affordable at $15.95, perhaps because it barely looks anything at all like Harrison Ford.

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Far more collectible is the Star Wars ™: A New Hope ™ Royal or Rebel? Vader and Leia Ornament With Sound:

In a show of bravery and defiance, Princess Leia Organa™ claims to be on a diplomatic mission, but Darth Vader™ knows she is part of the Rebel Alliance and a traitor. Relive this memorable scene with stunning detail and sound at the push of a button.

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Also, Star Wars: The Force Awakens T-70 X-Wing™ Fighter Ornament With Sound, the most heavily trademarked Christmas decoration in the arsenal.

Go in full throttle! With its double-layered wings in the open “X” position, Poe Dameron’s Resistance starfighter is ready to face the forces of the evil First Order. Authentic movie battle sounds put you right in the middle of the action.

star-wars-the-force-awakens-t70-xwing-fighter-ornament-with-sound-root-3295qxi3411_1470_1

Fans of other movies better watch out, they better not cry, because the Alien Queen from Aliens Ornament is coming to town.

This extraterrestrial queen became one of the most iconic aliens in sci-fi film history. Now, she can be yours in the safest way possible—hanging from your Christmas tree.

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Then there’s Captain America: Civil War Team Captain America Ornament, an image so heroic it needs Cap’s name in there twice.

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And the pinnacle of this year’s line is the Star Wars™ Death Star Tree Topper With Lights for $99.95. I know seeing that made me want to say the savior’s name, if not in a reverent way.

That’s no moon—it’s the ultimate tree topper for any Star Wars™ fan. Expertly crafted to resemble the Empire’s armored space station, this Death Star’s design won’t pull you in with a tractor beam, but it will capture your attention with its awesome light and sound features! Included remote control features the iconic Imperial insignia crest. Learn more about Keepsake Ornaments….

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As for sound, not “O, Little Town of Bethlehem” or even “We Three Kings of Orient Are”:

Press button on remote control (included) to see Death Star™ illuminate and hear the Star Wars: Main Title and The Imperial March….

Pixel Scroll 6/24/16 Porcupine Tree’s Yellow Pixel Dreamscroll

(1) BREXIT. J. K. Rowling’s response to the Brexit voting reports was –

“Death Eaters are everywhere,” said Micheline Hess.

(2) BRIXIT. Caption: “Live scenes from the Channel tunnel.”

View post on imgur.com

(3) BEAT THE RUSH. Buzzfeed found “19 People Who Are Moving To Australia Now That Britain Is Leaving Europe”. One of them is ours.

  1. This person who was so prepared to move to Australia that they already did it.

(4) AUF WIEDERSEHEN. So who’s cheering the outcome? Vox Day, naturally: “England and Wales choose freedom”.

The Fourth Reich is rejected by a narrow margin, 52 percent to 48 percent, thanks to the actual British people, who outvoted the invaders, the traitors, the sell-outs, and the Scots….

(5) IMPORT DUTY. And Marko Kloos has his joke ready.

(6) THE FORCE IS STRONG WITH THIS ONE. Darth Vader will be back in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and James Earl Jones will be back as Darth’s voice.

The original Sith Lord is back. A new cover story from Entertainment Weekly confirms plenty of details for this winter’s Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, but there’s one long-rumored detail that’s sure to have fans breathing heavily: Darth Vader will return in the new film.

It only makes sense that Anakin Skywalker would once again plague the Rebellion in Rogue One. The plot of the film sees a band of ragtag Rebel fighters tracking down plans for the Death Star from the original Star Wars trilogy. The planet-sized weapon was Vader’s pet project, so seeing him again isn’t a total surprise. Still, it’s nice to finally have the information 100% locked in after months of speculation.

Update: It gets better. EW has also confirmed that James Earl Jones will be returning to voice Vader in Rogue One. Jones reprised the role for the animated Star Wars Rebels recently, but this will mark a big return to the silver screen. However, Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy cautioned fans not to expect Vader to be a prominent presence in Rogue One. “He will be in the movie sparingly. But at a key, strategic moment, he’s going to loom large.” Well, he only had 12 minutes of screen time in the original Star Wars, and look how that turned out.

(7) PAT CADIGAN UPDATE. Yesterday Pat Cadigan told about a great doctor’s report in “Yeah, Cancer––Keep Running, You Little B!tch”.

My oncologist was smiling broadly  even before she called my name.

The level of cancer in my body has fallen again, this time very slightly. The rest of my tests are perfect. Unquote; she said perfect. She also likes my I’m Making Cancer My B!tch t-shirt. I am killing this cancer thing.

Maybe people’s reaction was too effusive. Pat thought they got the wrong idea, so today she wrote, “I Think I Have To Clarify Something”.

Which is to say, I still have cancer, and unless something miraculous happens, I will always have cancer. Recurrent endometrial cancer (aka recurrent uterine cancer) is inoperable, incurable, and terminal. There are something like four different forms (I think it’s four) and I have the one with the worst prognosis.

However, it is treatable. My cancer cells have progesterone receptors, which means that doses of progesterone can keep it stabilised at a low level. For how long? Impossible to say. Could be months. Could be a few years. Could be more than a few years. Nobody knows…just like someone without cancer. Technically, I’m still terminal but now the more accurate term would be incurable. My own preference is incorrigible.

(8) HE SAYS GIVE THANKS. Peter David has this take on the Star Trek fan film guidelines.

So thanks mostly to the efforts of the “Axanar” people, the guys who raised a million bucks to produce a “Star Trek” based film which resulted in a lawsuit, Paramount has now issued specific guidelines for anyone who wants to make a Trek fan film. And naturally fans are unhappy about it.

My response?

You guys are damned lucky.

When I was producing a “Star Trek” fanzine back in the 1970s, Paramount issued a decree: No one could write “Star Trek” fanfic. It was copyright infringement, plain and simple, and not to be allowed. At one convention I attended, Paramount lawyers actually came into the dealer’s room and confiscated peoples’ fanzines from right off their tables.

The fact that they loosened up to the degree that they have should be something fan filmmakers should feel damned grateful for….

(9) MEANWHILE CAPTAIN KIRK IS OUT OF WORK. At the Saturn Awards, William Shatner told a reporter he’s up for it.

Shatner, 85, spoke to reporters at the Saturn Awards in Los Angeles, and confirmed that he will not appear in “Star Trek Beyond,” according to the Belfast Telegraph.

But when asked about future movies, the actor was willing.

“We’d all be open to it, but it’s not going to happen,” he said. “”The fans would love to see it. Have them write to [‘Star Trek Beyond’ producer] J.J. Abrams at Paramount Studios.”

(10) COMIC BOOK ART. M.D. Jackson continues answering “Why Was Early Comic Book Art so Crude? (Part 3)” at Amazing Stories. By now, things are looking up –

[At Marvel] The artists excelled at creating dynamic panels. More than just men in tights who beat up bad guys, the Marvel heroes had depth and the art reflected that. Unusual angles and lighting effects were explored and the character’s expressions had to relay the complex emotions they were feeling (even when they were wearing a mask).

(11) WHERE THE BOYS ARE. Vox Day saw the Yahoo! Movies post about the Moana trailer disguising that it’s a princess movie (guess where?) and made a trenchant comment in “The Disney bait-and-switch” at Vox Popoli.

Boys don’t want to see movies about princesses. Boys don’t want to read books about romances either. But rather than simply making movies that boys want to see and publishing books that boys want to read, the SJWs in Hollywood and in publishing think that the secret to success is making princess movies and publishing romances, then deceiving everyone as to the content.

(12) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • June 24, 1997 — The U.S. Air Force officials release a 231-page report dismissing long-standing claims of an alien spacecraft crash in Roswell, New Mexico, almost exactly 50 years earlier.

(13) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY BOY

  • June 24, 1947 – Peter Weller, of Buckaroo Banzai fame.

(14) TODAY’S TRIVIA

  • Bela Lugosi’s appearance in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948) would be only the second time he appeared as Dracula on screen. It would also be his last time to do so.

(15) BY JOVE, I THINK THEY’VE GOT IT.

(16) RULES OF THE ROAD. Alexandra Erin, in “The Internet Is Not Your Global Village”, experiments with a solution to a chronic shortcoming of social media.

Now, I don’t have a detailed set of guidelines or proposed social mores for interacting with people online to go with this observation. I can tell you this: the ones we use for offline interactions don’t work, and any proposed rule needs to take into account the vast differences between online interactions and offline ones.

So let’s take a quick stab at formulating some….

You Having Something To Say Is Not The Same As Me Having Something To Hear

If you and I are having a conversation and what I say sparks some kind of personal connection with you, then by all means, you take that tangent and you run with it. I mean, there are nuances and shades… if I’m talking about the time my true love got caught in a bear trap along with a bear who mauled them to death while a swarm of bees enraged by the bear stealing honey stung them both, further aggravating the bear, and you say, “Yeah, speaking of pain, that reminds me of the time I got a paper cut. Hurt like anything, it did!”… well, I think most people would say that’s a bit boorish.

But if we’re just talking, and I mention a frustration and you’re like, “I know what that’s like, [similar experience]”… that’s a conversation.

(17) TESTING FOR TWANG. When an author decides to have nasal surgery, it’s always nice to have it reviewed in full multimedia fashion as Mary Robinette Kowal does in “What do I sound like after surgery? Like this…”

I’ve been very pleased that I still look like myself. The swelling will keep going down, albeit more slowly. The big question though is… what do I sound like? As an audiobook narrator, this was one of the things I was worried about since mucking about with the nose and sinuses can change resonance.

So, here, for your amusement, are four recordings of me reading the same piece of text….

(18) ANIME NEXT. Petréa Mitchell brings the harvest home early with her “Summer 2016 Anime Preview” at Amazing Stories.

Just when you’re all settled into the routine of one anime season, it’s time for another! Here’s what the sf world will get to see from the anime world in July.

(19) FRANK OR VITRIOLIC? the Little Red Reviewer asks a question to begin “On writing negative reviews”

Hey blogger buddies – do you write negative reviews? And what I mean by a negative review isn’t “this book sucks”, it’s “this book didn’t work for me and let me tell you why”. A well written negative review tells you just as much information about the book about a positive review. When I write critical / negative reviews, it’s mostly to talk about why I bounced off a book, or why I though the book was problematic. Oftentimes, it’s a book that the majority of readers really enjoyed, perhaps the book even won a ton of awards, but really, really didn’t work for me. Any of my friends will tell you I’m not the kind of person to sugar coat. If I think something didn’t work on some level, I’m going to say so. If I was offended by something, or thought it was boring, or thought the POV switches weren’t clear, I’m going to say so. If a book made me, personally, feel like the world of that book is not a world I would be welcome in, I’m going to say that too.

I do not write negative reviews to dig at an author, or to convince others not to read that author’s books…

(20) SHOULD WE? Krysta at Pages Unbound Reviews asks “Why Aren’t We Talking about Religious Diversity?”

However, religious diversity is regularly glossed over in discussions of representations or is regularly dismissed by those who find a character of faith to be “too preachy” or don’t want religion “shoved down their throats.”  This attitude does a disservice to the many people of faith throughout the world who would also like to see themselves reflected in characters in books.  It assumes that the presence of an individual of faith is, by nature, overbearing, unwelcome, and oppressive–that is, apparently an individual is allowed to have a faith as long as no one else has the misfortune of knowing about it.

However, despite the lack of characters of faith in modern and mainstream literature, a majority of the world identifies with some form of religion.  The Pew Research Group in 2010 determined that 16.3% of respondents were not affiliated with any sort of religion.  The other ~83% identified with a religious group.  That is, in any group of ten people, you could theoretically assume eight were religious.  And yet religion remains absent in most YA and MG books.

But, for many individuals, religion is more than an abstract belief in a higher deity.  Religion is something that affects one’s philosophy, one’s actions, one’s daily life.

(21) MAYBE A LITTLE AFRAID. Yahoo! Movies describes the Ghostbusters theme remake.

Paul Feig’s reboot of Ghostbusters gives everything a full redo — including, it turns out, the classic, catchy, campy theme song by Ray Parker Jr. The theme song as revamped by Fall Out Boy with Missy Elliott, released this morning (hear it above), abandons the bright pop past in favor of a darker guitar-heavy dose of alternative/mid-2000s emo angst. Be prepared to hear this song in various Hot Topics for the next couple of weeks/months/years.

 

(22) THE MYSTERIOUS EAST. A surprising objective of Russian technological research? The BBC explains in “Beam me up, Prime Minister”.

A popular Russian paper said that a governmental working group was meeting up to discuss the national technological development programme. The programme envisages, among other things, that by 2035 Russia will develop its own programming language, secure communications systems and… teleportation.

For the initial stage of the programme development, 2016-18, the agency responsible is seeking about 10bn roubles (£100m) in financing.

There was an online reaction to this bold statement. Russian internet users reacted in all kinds of different ways, from disbelief, to amazement to sarcasm.

…In another typical comment, popular user “Dyadyushka Shu” joked about money being “teleported” away from Russia: “Experiments in teleportation have been going on in Russia for a long time – billions of dollars have already been successfully teleported to Panama offshores.”

Spoiler Warning: Chip Hitchcock explains, “Really only at the quantum level, but handled so clumsily that the satirists had a field day.”

(23) QUEASINE. Is this what Death Eaters snack on?

[Thanks to JJ, John King Tarpinian, Chip Hitchcock, and Dave Doering for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Simon Bisson.]

Lucas Drops Attempt To Build Museum in Chicago

lucas-museum-1_600xx2833-1895-1662-0

Chicago will not be home to the George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, the Lucas Foundation announced today. Lucas wants to see the museum completed in his lifetime, and is unwilling to engage in time-consuming litigation with Friends of Parks to use the Chicago lakefront location approved by local government. The museum will now be built somewhere in California. It is the second time Lucas’ efforts have been defeated, the first coming when his original proposal to build on the grounds of the Presidio failed to gain acceptance in San Francisco.

The Lucas Foundation said in a press release:

…In light of extensive delays caused by Friends of the Parks, Chicago will no longer be considered a potential site for the museum. The board of directors and executive leadership of the museum confirmed that California will be its future home.

“No one benefits from continuing their seemingly unending litigation to protect a parking lot,” said George W. Lucas, founder and chairman of the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art. “The actions initiated by Friends of Parks and their recent attempts to extract concessions from the city have effectively overridden approvals received from numerous democratically elected bodies of government.”

The location — a parking lot near Soldier Field — was originally selected by Chicago’s Site Selection Task Force in May 2014 and subsequently approved by the City Council, Park District, Plan Commission, Department of Zoning, Illinois General Assembly and the governor. When the city offered McCormick Place East as an alternative to the parking lot, Friends of the Parks announced plans to block consideration of that location as well as any lakefront site or park in Chicago….

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel issued a statement:

Two years ago to the day, George Lucas and Mellody Hobson announced that they had chosen Chicago as the site of their incredible legacy investment. The opportunity for a City to gain a brand new museum is rare, and this particular opportunity – a gift worth approximately $1.5 billion – would have been the largest philanthropic contribution in Chicago’s history….

We tried to find common ground to resolve the lawsuit – the sole barrier preventing the start of the museum’s construction. But despite our best efforts to negotiate a common solution that would keep this tremendous cultural and economic asset in Chicago, Friends of the Parks chose to instead negotiate with themselves while Lucas negotiated with cities on the West Coast.

Friends of the Parks response, reported by the Chicago Tribune, reaffirmed its position that the Lucas project did not belong on the lakefront:

“It is unfortunate that the Lucas Museum has made the decision to leave Chicago rather than locate the museum on one of several alternative sites that is not on Chicago’s lakefront. That would have been the true win-win,” Friends of the Parks Executive Director Juanita Irizarry and board chair Lauren Moltz said in a statement. Irizarry could not immediately be reached. Moltz declined additional comment.

Friends of the Parks argued that the museum plans violate the public trust doctrine, benefit a private interest more than the state’s residents and tarnish the city’s lakefront. While the group hinted at a compromise in recent days, Friends of the Parks did not withdraw its lawsuit and remained steadfast in its opposition to lakefront development.

One news source says Lucas is back in discussion with the city of San Francisco. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti also is active in the media trying to attract Lucas’ interest in LA.

The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit in South Pasadena

By John King Tarpinian: Thursday evening the South Pasadena, CA main library screened Ray Bradbury’s Wonderful Ice Cream Suit. This is a Disney movie that very few people have ever heard of or seen, yet it is considered to be the best translation of a Bradbury story to film. Among those who thought this was Ray himself. Of course, he wrote the script.

Before the evening’s festivities there were a few guest speakers. Lisa Reynolds, owner of the Fremont Center Theatre, where Ray produced his last plays…Ice Cream Suit, twice. Lisa talked about what an honor to have had her 99-seat theater selected by Ray. Next was Robert Kerr, a member of the Ray Bradbury Pandemonium Theatre Company.

Lisa Reynolds COMP

Lisa Reynolds

Up next was Stuart Gordon, director. Stuart talked about getting the film made. Ray was on set every day. Sid Caesar and Howard Morris played the tailor and his assistant. Writing a script for those two made no sense, they just improvised their scene. Ray was in tears laughing so hard during filming. If you are too young to have grown up with Your Show of Shows go directly to YouTube. If you have watched The Andy Griffith Show, Howard Morris was Earnest T. Bass.

Stuart Gordon

Stuart Gordon

Last up was Joe Mantegna. One of his first acting performances while a young man in Chicago was in a stage production of Ice Cream Suit. Then 25 years later he was asked to reprise the role in the movie. Joe has done other appearances to support the movie and libraries. Last year he helped support the Pomona Library with a screening of the movie. Coming this August 22 (see Wednesday’s Scroll), he will be reading passages in the garden in front of the Los Angeles Central Library on what would have been Ray’s 96th birthday.

Joe Mantegna

Joe Mantegna

The screening was in a library’s community room, which was the original Carnegie library. They had set up 125 chairs initially and had to put out more as people arrived with some late comers having to stand. This is a fun movie to watch with an audience who has never seen the movie before because of what might be one of the greatest “reveals” on film. No spoiler.

If you’ve not seen this lovely little movie I suggest you go to Amazon to either stream it or buy the DVD. It really is worth it. Not sci-fi but a lovely fairytale.

2016 Saturn Awards

Saturn 1The Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announced the 2016 Saturn Award winners on June 22 in Burbank.

John Barrowman, the awards host, is shown here in a photo with Alex Kingston, on hand to pick up the award for Doctor Who’s “The Husbands of River Song,” and Buffy veteran Clare Kramer.

2016 Saturn Winners

Best Science Fiction Film: Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens

Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture: Ant-Man

Best Fantasy Film: Cinderella

Best Horror Film: Crimson Peak

Best Action / Adventure Film: Furious 7

Best Thriller Film: Bridge of Spies

Best Actor in a Film: Harrison Ford (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Actress in a Film: Charlize Theron (Mad Max: Fury Road)

Best Supporting Actor in a Film: Adam Driver (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Supporting Actress in a Film: Jessica Chastain (Crimson Peak)

Best Performance by a Younger Actor: Ty Simpkins (Jurassic World)

Best Director: Ridley Scott (The Martian)

Best Writing: Lawrence Kasdan, J.J. Abrams, Michael Arndt (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Production Design: Thomas E. Sanders (Crimson Peak)

Best Editing: Maryann Brandon, Mary Jo Markey (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Music: John Williams (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Costume: Alexandra Byrne (Avengers: Age of Ultron)

Best Make-Up: Neal Scanlan (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Special Effects: Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan, Chris Corbould (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens)

Best Independent Film Release: Room

Best International Film Release: Turbo Kid

Best Animated Film: Inside Out

Best Science Fiction Television Series: Continuum

Best Fantasy Television SeriesOutlander

Best Horror Television Series: The Walking Dead

Best Action / Thriller Television Series: Hannibal

Best Superhero Adaptation Television Series: The Flash

Best New Media Television Series: Marvel’s Daredevil

Best Television Presentation: Doctor Who: The Husbands of River Song

Best Actor on Television: Bruce Campbell (Ash vs. Evil Dead)

Best Actress on Television: Caitriona Balfe (Outlander)

Best Supporting Actor on Television: Richard Armitage (Hannibal)

Best Supporting Actress on Television: Danai Gurira (The Walking Dead)

Best Performance by a Younger Actor: Chandler Riggs (The Walking Dead)

Best Guest Star on Television: William Shatner (Haven)

Best DVD / BD Release: Burying The Ex

Best DVD / BD Classic Film Release: Miracle Mile

Best DVD / BD Collection Release: The Frank Darabont Collection

Best DVD / BD Television Series Release: The X-Files: Collector’s Set

Best DVD / BD Special Edition Release: X-Men: Days of Future Past (Rogue Cut)

Best Local Live Stage ProductionTarzan (3D Theatricals)

The Lifetime Achievement Award: Nichelle Nichols

The George Pal Memorial Award: Simon Kinberg

The President’s Award: Television’s Haven

The Spotlight Award: Better Call Saul

The Dan Curtis Legacy Award: Eric Kripke

The Special Recognition Award: Brannon Braga

The Breakthrough Performance Award: Melissa Benoist

Pixel Scroll 6/23/16 Where The Scrolls Have No Name

(1) THE LEMONADE IS READY. Rachel Swirsky’s Patreon donors are enjoying the squozen fruits of victory.

One of those donors tells me the story has two Chapter Fives.

(2) AXANAR TEASERS. Space.com ran an exclusive story,  “Trailer for ‘Star Trek: Axanar’ Unveiled Amid Lawsuit”, about the filmmaker’s unexpected decision:

A second teaser trailer for a fan-made “Star Trek” movie was released this week, despite an ongoing lawsuit over the film.

The new teaser trailer for “Star Trek: Axanar” was released by the filmmakers yesterday (June 22). Called “Honor Through Victory,” the trailer shows Klingon ships flying through a planetary ring system and features an intense voice-over that sounds like a prebattle pep talk. This is the second of three teaser trailers set to be released this week. The first, titled “Stands United,” also appeared online yesterday. The “Honor Through Victory” teaser trailer was shared exclusively with Space.com.

 

(3) VINTAGE TV. Echo Ishii is tracking down antique sf shows in “SF Obscure: The wishlist Roundup” for Smart Girls Love Sci-Fi Romance.

Since it’s summer once again, it’s time  to I hunt down the really obscure classics or try to sample B/C list  shows and see how many episodes I can survive. This time around I decided to make a list of those shows which I have not seen, but added to my wishlist. Most are only on limited DVD runs.  Based on cloudy memories jarred by  the vast world of YouTube, I  tracked down a stray episodes, or a set of clips, or an old commercial to remind me of their existence. Here are a select few.

The post discusses Mercy Point, Birds of Prey, Starhunter, and Space Rangers.

(4) JIM CARREY TURNS TO HORROR. Variety reports “Jim Carrey, Eli Roth Team on Horror Film ‘Aleister Arcane’”.

Jim Carrey will star in and executive produce while Eli Roth directs the long-in-development horror movie “Aleister Arcane” for Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment.

“Aleister Aracane,” written by Steven Niles, was first published in 2004 by IDW Comics. Jon Croker will adapt for the screen.

Mandeville Films’ David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman will produce along with Michael Aguilar.

The story centers on a group of children who befriend a bitter old man ruined and shunned by their parents. After his death, only they have the power to thwart the curse he has laid upon their town.

(5) TODAY IN HISTORY

Logans Run

  • June 23, 1976 Logan’s Run (the movie) was released.
  • June 23, 1989 — Tim Burton’s noir spin on the well-known story of the DC Comics hero Batman is released in theaters.
  • June 23, 2016 – Today is National Pink Flamingo Day.

(6) FIRST PAST THE POST. Rachel Neumeier tells how she surprised herself in “Hugo Voting: at last, the novels”:

Okay, now, listen. I went in knowing, just *knowing* that I was either going to put Ancillary Mercy or Uprooted in the top spot, the other one second. I hadn’t read the other three nominees at the time. I was happy to try The Fifth Season, unhappy about being forced to try Seveneves, and okay if not enthusiastic with trying The Aeronaut’s Windlass.

That’s how I started out.

I have seldom been more surprised in my life as to find myself putting Seveneves in the top spot….

I guess I’d better read it after all. 😉

(7) PUPPY CHOW. Lisa Goldstein continues her reviews of Hugo nominated work with “Short Story: ‘If You Were an Award, My Love’”. About the review she promises: “It’s a bit intemperate.”

“If You Were an Award, My Love” is not so much a story as a group of schoolkids drawing dirty pictures in their textbooks and snickering.

(8) JUSTICE IS NOT BLIND. Joe Sherry continues his series at Nerds of a Feather with “Reading the Hugos: Short Story”, in which No Award does not finish last….

While I am clearly not blind to the controversy surrounding this year’s Hugo Awards (nor is The G, for that matter), I have mostly chosen to cover each category on the relative subjective merits of the nominated works. I understand that this is something that not everyone can or will choose to do, but it is the way that I have elected to engage with the Hugo Awards. While the result of the Hugo Awards short list is not significantly different in regards to the Rabid Puppies straight up dominating most of the categories / finalists with their slate, the difference is that this year they have selected to bulk nominate a group that includes more works that might have otherwise had a reasonable chance of making the ballot and also that meets my subjective definition of “quality”. That slate from the Rabid Puppies also includes a number of works that come across as little more than an extended middle finger to the people who care about the Hugo Awards. Feel free to argue with any or all of my opinions here.

(9) FEELING COLD. Not that Kate Paulk liked any of these Hugo nominees, but in her pass through the Best Semiprozine category she delivered the least condemnation to Sci Phi Journal:

Sci Phi Journal edited by Jason Rennie – Sci Phi was the only finalist with any content that drew me in, and honestly, not all of it. I could have done without the philosophical questions at the end of each fiction piece, although that is the journal’s signature, so I guess it’s required. I’d rather ponder the questions the stories in questions raised without the explicit pointers – although I will say they weren’t as heavy-handed as they could have been, and they did highlight the issues quite well. I’m just fussy, I guess.

(10) AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL GRAPHIC NOVEL. Paul Dini signs at Vromans Bookstore in Pasadena on Friday, June 24 at 7:00.

Dark Knight

This is a Batman story like no other the harrowing and eloquent autobiographical tale of writer Paul Dini’s courageous struggle to overcome a desperate situation.

The Caped Crusader has been the all-abiding icon of justice and authority for generations. But in this surprising original graphic novel, we see Batman in a new light as the savior who helps a discouraged man recover from a brutal attack that left him unable to face the world. In the 1990s, legendary writer Paul Dini had a flourishing career writing the hugely popular “Batman: The Animated Series” and “Tiny Toon Adventures.” Walking home one evening, he was jumped and viciously beaten within an inch of his life. His recovery process was arduous, hampered by the imagined antics of the villains he was writing for television including the Joker, Harley Quinn and the Penguin. But despite how bleak his circumstances were, or perhaps because of it, Dini also always imagined the Batman at his side, chivvying him along during his darkest moments. A gripping graphic memoir of one writer’s traumatic experience and his deep connection with his creative material, Dark Night: A True Batman Story is an original graphic novel that will resonate profoundly with fans. Art by the incredible and talented Eduardo Risso…

(11) WORLD FANTASY AWARD WINNER. Jesse Hudson reviews Sofia Samatar’s A Stranger in Olondria at Speculiction.

If it isn’t obvious, A Stranger in Olondria is one of those novels where the road beneath the feet only reveals itself after the reader has taken the step—what the foot lands so rich and engaging as to compel the next step.  The novel a journey of discovery, there are elements of Robert Silverberg’s Lord Valentine’s Castle as much as Ursula Le Guin’s The Tombs of Atuan.  A coming of age via a very personal quest, Samatar unleashes all her skill as a storyteller in relating Jevick’s tale.

But the novel’s heart is nicely summed up by Amel El-Mohtar: it is about the human “vulnerability to language and literature, and the simultaneous experience of power and surrender inherent in the acts of writing and reading.”

 [Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day LunarG.]