World Fantasy Con 2017: Partial List of Programs

WFC 2017 has released a partial list of draft program topics.

  • Alternate Africas: The Growing List of Fantastic Alternate and Secret Narratives Set in Africa
  • Beards and Intrigue: Queering the Historical Fantastic
  • Calamity Jane Defeats Conan: The Persistence of American Folklore in Fantasy Literature
  • Exceptional Characters in Horrible Times
  • The Fiction of Mildred Clingerman
  • Gender Fluidity in Fantasy
  • History — Secret, Hidden, or Otherwise
  • Keeping Texas Weird
  • Kitsune and Dragon: Thoughtful Approaches to Alternate Eastern Asias
  • Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley: Still our Modern Prometheus
  • Metaphors and Metadata: Libraries in Fantasy Literature
  • Molly Weasley Was a Bad Ass: Aged Protagonists in Fantasy
  • New Twists On Traditional Myths & Archetypes : What are the Pitfalls?
  • The Old West: Not Entirely Wild but Always a Fantasy
  • Once More Around the Bloch
  • The Other in Fantasy when Everyone is an Other
  • Place Matters: Geography’s Influence on Fantasy
  • Pulp Era Influences: the Expiration Date
  • Putting Historical Persons into your Fantasy
  • Religions of the African Diaspora: Beyond Zombies, Ancestors, and Giant Apes
  • Research, Research, Recherchez: History is Easy to Get Lost In
  • The Role of the City in Fantasy Settings
  • Small Presses that Open their Doors to the Unusual: Past and Present
  • Urban Legends in the Age of Fake News
  • What’s the Difference Between Dark Fantasy and Horror

More information about the convention’s scope, theme, timeline and goals is available on the Programming main page.

World Fantasy Convention 2018 Announces Kaaron Warren as GOH

Kaaron Warren

World Fantasy Convention 2018 – Baltimore has announced another Guest of Honor, Australian author Kaaron Warren. She joins previously announced Guests of Honor Scott Edelman, Tom Kidd, and Michael J. Walsh, Special Guest Aliette de Bodard, and Toastmaster Linda D. Addison.

Kaaron Warren won the Shirley Jackson Award for her novella “Sky,” which also was a 2013 nominee for the World Fantasy Award. Her 2016 novel, The Grief Hole (IFWG Publishing Australia), is the first to win all three Australian genre awards: the Aurealis Award, the Ditmar Award, and the Australian Shadows, as well as winning the Canberra Critics Circle Award. Her first novel, Slights (Angry Robot Books, 2009) won the Australian Shadows Awards, Ditmar Award, and the Canberra Critics Circle Fiction Award. Her story, “Death’s Door Café,” was a World Fantasy Award nominee in 2015.

Warren also has published two other novels and seven collections of her short stories. Her stories have appeared in Australia, the US, the UK, and elsewhere in Europe, and have been selected for both Ellen Datlow’s and Paula Guran’s Year’s Best anthologies.

Kaaron Warren lives in Canberra, Australia. In addition to writing, she was a Fellow at the Museum for Australian Democracy. In 2018 she will be the Established Artist in Residence at the Katharine Susannah Prichard House in Western Australia.

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 in Baltimore is a joint effort of The Baltimore Science Fiction Society (BSFS) and the Washington Science Fiction Association (WSFA). It will be held at the Marriott Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, Nov 1 – 4, 2018.

2017 SMOFCon Scholarships Available

CanSMOF Inc. is offering up to three scholarships for convention runners to be used towards the cost of attending SMOFCon 35, being held in Boston, December 1-3, 2017. SMOFCon is the annual convention about organizing Science Fiction conventions.

The first Scholarship of up to 500 CAD is open to a Canadian citizen or resident involved in running conventions with a preference for those who have not previously attended a SMOFCon.

The second scholarship of up to 1000 CAD is open to anyone not residing in North America*, involved in running conventions with a preference for those who have not previously attended a SMOFCon.

The third scholarship of up to 500 CAD is open to anyone involved in running conventions, regardless of their place of residence with a preference for those who have not previously attended a SMOFCon.

Applicants will automatically be considered for any and all scholarships for which they are eligible. Preference will be given to fans who have not previously attended a SMOFCon, but this is not necessary to be an applicant. The submission deadline is September 10th, 2017, 23:59 SST (UTC-11). We reserve the right to not award any or all scholarships. Any questions should be directed to smofcon.scholarship@gmail.com.

To apply for a scholarship, simply follow this link: https://goo.gl/forms/lPeGaCiqrNyEGr7o2

CanSMOF Inc. is the organization that hosted the 2009 Worldcon in Montreal.

More information on Smofcon 35 may be found here. General information about Smofcons, including a list of past Smofcons may be found here

*North America: defined as Canada, Mexico, the United States of America, the islands of the Caribbean, St. Pierre et Miquelon, Bermuda, and the Bahamas.

World Fantasy Convention 2018 Announces Toastmaster

Linda Addison

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 – Baltimore has selected Linda D. Addison as Toastmaster. She joins previously announced Guests of Honor Scott Edelman, Tom Kidd, Michael J. Walsh, and Aliette de Bodard.

Addison is poetry editor for Space & Time magazine as well as an author and poet with over 300 poems and short stories in print.

Addison is the first African-American to win the Horror Writers’ of America Bram Stoker Award, which she has won four times. She won for poetry collections in 2001 for Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes (Space & Time Books) and in 2013 for The Four Elements written with Marge Simon, Rain Graves, and Charlee Jacob (Bad Moon Books). She won for poetry in 2007 (tie) for Being Full of Light, Insubstantial (2007 Space & Time Books) and in 2011 for How To Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend short stories and poetry collection (2011 Necon E-Books). Her Dark Duet (Necon E-Books), a collaborative book of poetry written with Stephen M. Wilson was a 2012 finalist.

The Black Writers Alliance nominated her collection, Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes, for its Gold Pen Award. Her work frequently appears on the Honorable Mention list for Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror (edited by Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link and Gavin Grant) and The Year’s Best Science-Fiction (edited by Gardner Dozois). She also has been nominated for a SFPA Rhysling award.

Addison has fiction in three landmark anthologies that celebrate African-American speculative writers: the award-winning anthology Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction (Warner Aspect), Dark Dreams I and II (Kensington), and Dark Thirst (Pocket Book).

She co-edited Sycorax’s Daughters, an anthology of horror fiction & poetry by African-American women (publisher Cedar Grove Publishing) with Kinitra Brooks and Susana Morris.

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 in Baltimore is a joint effort of The Baltimore Science Fiction Society (BSFS) and the Washington Science Fiction Association (WSFA). It will be held at the Marriott Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, Nov 1 – 4, 2018. The convention is chaired by Ann Marie Rudolph and Bill Lawhorn.

The Attending membership rate is currently $175. Registration options and more information about the World Fantasy Convention 2018 can be found on its website.

Utah Wins 2019 Westercon Bid

Utah’s unopposed bid to host the 2019 Westercon won the site selection vote. The results were announced on July 2 at this year’s con in Tempe, Arizona.

Utah Fandom Organization, Inc. will host Westercon72 in Layton, UT with Kate Hatcher as chair. Their website will be online shortly

Kevin Standlee reports 43 votes were cast, with 4 No Preference. The 39 votes expressing a preference went to —

Utah 32
Tonopah NV 3
Reno NV 2
Hopland CA 1
“Both” 1

Westercon 72 has announced their guests of honor:

  • Author Guest of Honor: Jim Butcher
  • Artist Guest of Honor: Vincent Villafranca
  • Cosplay Guest of Honor: Kitty Krell
  • Fan Guests of Honor: Kevin Standlee, Lisa Hayes, and Kuma Bear

There is also a Utah for 2019 bid for the NASFiC, which if selected will be held in combination with Westercon 72.

SDCC and SLCC Ask Judge To Decide Comic Con Mark Litigation

San Diego Comic-Con International has been trying control the term “Comic-Con” term for decades. In August 2014 they filed suit in U.S. District Court against the owners of the Salt Lake City Comic Con claiming the name of Salt Lake City’s event is too similar. The San Diego con claimed SLCC had piggybacked on its “creativity, ingenuity, and hard work,” and by using the Comic Con name “intended to suggest, mislead and confuse consumers into believing that the Salt Lake Comic Con convention is associated with, authorized by, endorsed by or sponsored by SDCC.”

The judge, as is commonly done, prodded SDCC and SLCC to have settlement discussions and resolve the case without trial. This month the Salt Lake City defendants (which includes Dan Farr Productions [DFP], and Dan Farr and Bryan Brandenburg as individuals) traveled to San Diego to give depositions leading up to a final settlement conference. SLCC’s Bryan Brandenburg subsequently told the Associated Press there was no compromise forthcoming from court-mandated conference. SDCC says they’ll only accept SLCC licensing the name “comic con” for a fee. Read “substantial fee.”

The AP reports that San Diego Comic-Con declined specific comment on the case, though they said Utah organizers’ position is “without merit.”

Salt Lake City Comic Con has now moved for summary judgment, calling on the court to render a decision on the existing record. SLCC’s primary argument is that SDCC has no rights to the generic term “comic con.” And if that’s not enough, mark history shows SDCC abandoned efforts to register “Comic Con” in favor of the hyphenated name “Comic-Con” and since SLCC does not use the hyphenated term in its name there is no infringement.

If summary judgment is not granted, or does not resolve all issues (as happened when a court issued a decision in the Dr. Seuss/ComicMix suit) the case could go to trial in the fall.

Brandenburg has continually appealed to the public, colorfully asking for “support from the community and all the powers of the Universe to bring victory to us in this case.” Three weeks ago he posted on Facebook the arguments in his defense; he asserts that the facts therein “are undisputed.”

1) Comic-Con International does not have a trademark for “Comic Con”. They tried to get it in 1996 but Chicago Comicon and Motor City Comic Con opposed the trademark and San Diego abandoned it. https://goo.gl/QXXSul Here is the DEAD trademark https://goo.gl/nWcByy

2) San Diego did not originate the name “comic con”. By the 1960’s, American (and British) comic book collectors were gathering for events that they called comicons, comic cons, comic conventions. In 1966, three comic cons were held in New York City alone, where comics originated. It wasn’t until 1970 that the Golden State Comic Book Convention was organized…and it wasn’t until later that it was called Comic-Con International.

3) In the 1990’s, SDCC had decided it should OWN the generic cultural terminology and began to process a series of applications for register marks but claimed they used the phrase and mark “exclusively” according to trademark applications. This was a false claim that was made on their trademark applications as there were many comic cons by this time and they did not originate the term.

4) Comic-Con, “Comic Con” and “Comic-Con” are generic and the trademark office should revoke SDCC’s trademarks not only because they are used generically in popular culture, but because their trademarks were obtained by falsely claiming exclusive use of the marks. They are generic because these terms identify a type of event, not any particular event or producer.

5) Furthermore, SDCC abandoned any rights it might have had by granting a naked license to at least one major comic con event. This means the license did not have sufficient oversight or controls. They also did not police said trademarks between 1995 and 2014 with comic cons all over the country that were non-affiliated and non-licensed.

6) “Comic Con” is not only generic in fact and by abandoned trademark application, but when Salt Lake Comic Con applied for the trademark for “Salt Lake Comic Con”, the attorneys at the TRADEMARK OFFICE RULED that a trademark could not be obtained because both “Salt Lake” and “Comic Con” were descriptive.

7) Salt Lake Comic Con has never used “Comic-Con” to describe it’s convention, but that doesn’t matter because many events around the country and the world use “comic-con” as part of their name and until SDCC filed their lawsuit in 2014 against SLCC they did NOT make most if not all of the comic-cons change their name, sign a license agreement or adhere to any type of standards or oversight. When they were forced to abandon the trademark for “comic con”, they then secured “comic-con” and have used it from that point forward.

8) “Comic Con” is generic and unprotectable. “Comic Con” simply denotes a comic con. Comic con is a noun indicating what an event is, not whose event it is. Even Wikipedia states “Comic con is any comic book convention.”

9) Salt Lake Comic Con relied on the fact that the “comic con” trademark was abandoned combined with the fact that every comic con outside of SDCC we talked with had no agreement with SDCC and asserted that “comic con” was generic.

10) SDCC’s trademarks should be canceled because they did not originate the term “comic con” AND they obtained them by falsely claiming exclusive use.

He has also made available redacted copies of SLCC’s latest court filings.

While litigation is always emotional, some say what really got SDCC’S goat was having the Salt Lake Comic Con’s garish “Tony Stark”-like Audi driving around downtown San Diego during their Comic-Con in 2014. The suit was filed a month later.

[Thanks to Dave Doering and Kate Hatcher for the story.]

Scott Edelman Named World Fantasy Con 2018 Guest of Honor

Scott Edelman

Congratulations to Scott Edelman, newly-added World Fantasy Convention 2018 guest of honor, joining the previously announced slate of Tom Kidd, Michael J. Walsh, and Aliette de Bodard.

Edelman began his career as an assistant editor and writer for Marvel Comics in the ‘70s. In addition to writing comic books and trade paperbacks, he edited its fan magazine FOOM! In 1976, he became a freelance writer for both Marvel and DC on a range of books.

He edited Science Fiction Age for its entire eight-year run from 1992 to 2000. He worked for the Syfy Channel for more than thirteen years, editing Science Fiction Weekly, SCI FI Wire, Sci-Fi Universe and Sci-Fi Flix. He also edited SCI FI Magazine, previously known as Sci-Fi Entertainment.

Edelman has had more than 85 short stories published in magazines, anthologies and several highly regarded short story collections. He has been a Stoker Award finalist seven times in the fiction categories, and a Hugo Award finalist for Best Editor four times, in 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999.

He won the Sam Moskowitz Award for outstanding contributions to the field of science fiction fandom in 2004.

Currently Edelman hosts a podcast, Eating the Fantastic, in which he interviews writers and others over a good meal. His most recent short story collection, Liars, Fakers, and the Dead Who Eat Them (Written Backwards) was published in March 2017. For more information on Edelman, visit his blog at his blog.

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 will be held at the Marriott Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, Nov 1 – 4, 2018.

Vernor Vinge at UCSD for “London in 2080” Series on June 29

SF writer Vernor Vinge and architect Niall McLaughlin will speak about Science Fiction Meets Architecture: Designing for an Aging Population as part of the Arthur C. Clarke Center for the Human Imagination’s “London in 2080” debate series on June 29. The event begins in UCSD’s Atkinson Hall Auditorium at 10:30 a.m.

As life expectancy increases and modern medicine changes the health and vitality of those in their 80s and 90s, there will be major changes in the design of space as the London population ages. Cognitive impairment will also be more widespread.

  • Vernor Vinge has won five Hugo Awards, including one for each of his last three novels, Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), and

Rainbow’s End (2006). Known for his rigorous hard-science approach to his science fiction, he became an iconic figure among cybernetic scientists with the publication in 1981 of his novella “True Names,” which is considered a seminal, visionary work of Internet fiction and cyberspace. Dr. Vinge is Emeritus professor of mathematics and computer science and also noted, among other things, for introducing the term “the singularity.”

  • Niall McLaughlin is an architect, and educator. Niall won Young British Architect of the Year in 1998. He was named as one of the BBC’s Rising Stars in 2001 and his work represented Britain in a US exhibition Gritty Brits at the Carnegie Mellon Museum. Niall was made a Honorary Royal Designer for Industry (2015) and he represented Ireland at the Venice Biennale Architettura 2016. Peabody Housing (Whitechapel 2015), and Somerville Student Residence (Oxford 2010). He is currently working on museum designs for the Natural History Museum in London and Auckland Castle in Durham. Niall is Professor of Architectural Practice at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. He was a visiting professor at the University of California Los Angeles from 2012-2013, and was appointed Lord Norman Foster Visiting Professor of Architecture at Yale for 2014-2015. Niall lives in London with his wife Mary, son Diarmaid and daughter Iseult.

The Debate Series is free and open to members of the public.

Sci-Fi Meets Architecture is a new forum for cross-disciplinary visions and debate at UCL and UCSD. Curated by: Prof David Kirsh (UCSD, San Diego), Prof Alan Penn (The Bartlett, UK), and Ava Fatah (Architectural Computation Programme, The Bartlett School of Architecture). Sponsored by the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination, The Bartlett School of Architecture, and The Leverhulme Trust.

Eurocon 2018 in Amiens

Next year’s Eurcon, Nemo 2018 will be held July 19-22 in Amiens, France – the location of Jules Verne’s house:

If the frame is SF, in Amiens, we can not reasonably ignore Jules Verne, and here we are quickly at the Steampunk point. The superb poster by Krystal Camprubi is there to remind that. Here we are, aboard the “Albatross” of Robur the conqueror, arriving in sight of the great Cathedral, a masterpiece labelled by UNESCO. The guest of honor, representing Africa, stands with a suitcase ready to disembark at the convention.

…Jules Verne has lived in Amiens for many years, and had written the most of his important novels in this house. Today, it’s a museum, reconstructing Verne’s daylife, and showing many interesting manuscripts, models, books, a.s.o. Eurocon members will get an opportunity to visit it during they’re staying in Amiens.

The guests of honor are “African Science Fiction” and Vladimir Arenev.

African Science Fiction is an important guest of honor of the Eurocon 2018 – Nemo

The magazine Galaxies has dedicated an issue to African Scifi, and some of the authors published in this magazine will be present in Amiens. The list has not been finalized at this time. But you can already discover them in french in Galaxies N ° 46. You will find here too a picture and presentation of Ketty Stewart and Oulimata Gueye, masters of this issue, and members of Nemo too.

VLADIMIR ARENEV

Vladimir Arenev is the pen name of the science fiction writer, journalist and screenwriter Vladimir Puziy. He writes in the Russian and Ukrainian languages, and resides in Kiev, Ukraine. Born in 1978 in the same city, he teaches the history of literature and directs writing workshops.

Aliette de Bodard Named Special Guest of WFC 2018

Aliette de Bodard

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 Baltimore has added Special Guest Aliette de Bodard. She joins WFC’s roster of guests along with Michael J. Walsh and Tom Kidd.

Aliette de Bodard is a Nebula, Locus, and BASFA Award winner. Her short stories are often set in an alternate universe based on a fusion of Aztec and Asian cultures. She lives and works in Paris, France. More information about Bodard can be found on her webpage.

The World Fantasy Convention 2018 in Baltimore is a joint effort of The Baltimore Science Fiction Society and the Washington Science Fiction Association. It will be held at the Marriott Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, Nov 1 – 4, 2018.

Attending membership rates are currently $175. Registration options and more information about the World Fantasy Convention 2018 can be found at the con’s website.