No James White Award for 2020

James White Award administrator Martin McGrath announced today they will not be running a competition in 2020.

We regret to announce that the James White Award will not be running a competition this year. Due to technical issues with the current website, and problems caused by a certain global crises beyond our control, we have not been able to set a timetable for this year and, with a great deal of reluctance, we have concluded that it will not be possible to schedule the competition in 2020.

The James White Award, established in 2000, offers non-professional writers the opportunity to have their work published in Interzone, the UK’s leading sf magazine. In addition last year, the winner received a £200 prize. The competition in prior years has been open to original, unpublished short stories of not more than 6,000 words by non-professional writers.

Award Administrator McGrath also said:

We have been put off this decision for months, hoping (perhaps increasingly foolishly) that we could come up with a fix for the problems we are facing within a timescale that would allow us to go ahead this year. Ultimately, however, it simply hasn’t been possible to get things in place in time and we have – with very great reluctance – made the decision to not hold the competition this year. We will, however, be back in 2021.

In 2019, judges Justina Robson, Chris Beckett and Donna Scott selected “Limitations” by David Maskill as the winner.

[Via Locus Online.]

2020 Dragon Award Ballot

The 2020 Dragon Awards Ballot was posted August 11. Registered voters should expect to receive notice in email.

It’s not too late to get involved. The Dragon Awards voter registration page states, “You may register to receive a ballot until 11:59 (EDT) on the Friday of Dragon Con,” which is September 4. Voting closes on September 5.

To be eligible for the 2020 Dragon Awards the book, comic, game, movie, must have been released between July 1, 2019, and the close of the eligibility period, June 30, 2020, which accounts for the mix of nominees from last year and this year.

According to the press release, “Nearly 38,000 fans have voted for their favorite works in the past four years, including more than 10,000 people who voted in 2019.”

Also, the Dragon Awards have forged a new partnership with the Fulton County Library System to promote the ballot and registration through their social media and other programs at the system’s 35 locations. Pat Henry, president of Dragon Con, Inc. said, “We are delighted to be working with Fulton County libraries to help spread the word and encourage more people to explore the best works of fiction in the galaxy.”

Interestingly, most categories have six nominees, but the Best Science Fiction Novel has eight:

1. Best Science Fiction Novel

  • The Testaments by Margaret Atwood
  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow
  • Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir
  • The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz
  • The Last Emperox by John Scalzi
  • The Rosewater Redemption by Tade Thompson
  • Network Effect by Martha Wells
  • Wanderers by Chuck Wendig

2. Best Fantasy Novel (Including Paranormal)

  • Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo
  • Jade War by Fonda Lee
  • Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
  • The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern
  • Dead Astronauts by Jeff VanderMeer
  • The Burning White by Brent Weeks

3. Best Young Adult / Middle Grade Novel

  • Finch Merlin and the Fount of Youth by Bella Forrest
  • Catfishing on CatNet by Naomi Kritzer
  • The Grace Year by Kim Liggett
  • Force Collector by Kevin Shinick
  • The Poison Jungle by Tui T. Sutherland
  • Cog by Greg van Eekhout

4. Best Military Science Fiction or Fantasy Novel

  • Savage Wars by Jason Anspach & Nick Cole
  • Edge of Valor by Josh Hayes
  • Aftershocks by Marko Kloos
  • Defiance by Bear Ross
  • Howling Dark by Christopher Ruocchio
  • System Failure by Joe Zieja

5. Best Alternate History Novel

  • The Girl with No Face by M. H. Boroson
  • Witchy Kingdom by D. J. Butler
  • Revolution by W. L. Goodwater
  • As Our World Ends by Jack Hunt
  • Up-time Pride and Down-time Prejudice by Mark H. Huston
  • A Nation Interrupted by Kevin McDonald

6. Best Media Tie-In Novel

  • Firefly – The Ghost Machine by James Lovegrove
  • Star Trek: Picard: The Last Best Hope by Una McCormack
  • Star Trek: Discovery: The Enterprise War by John Jackson Miller
  • Resistance Reborn by Rebecca Roanhorse
  • Aliens: Phalanx by Scott Sigler

7. Best Horror Novel

  • Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky
  • Scavenger Hunt by Michaelbrent Collings
  • The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher
  • The Pursuit of William Abbey by Claire North
  • The Toll by Cherie Priest

8. Best Comic Book

  • Avengers by Jason Aaron, Ed McGuinness
  • Bitter Root by David F. Walker, Chuck Brown, Sanford Greene
  • Immortal Hulk by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett
  • Monstress by Marjorie Liu, Sana Takeda
  • Spider-Woman by Karla Pacheco, Pere Perez, Paulo Siqueira
  • Undiscovered Country by Charles Soule, Scott Snyder, Daniele Orlandini, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Matt D. Wilson

9. Best Graphic Novel

  • Batman Universe by Brian Michael Bendis, Nick Derington
  • Battlestar Galactica Counterstrike by John Jackson Miller, Daniel HDR
  • Black Bolt by Christian Ward, Frazier Irving, Stephanie Hans
  • Dragon Hoops by Gene Luen Yang
  • Mister Miracle by Tom King, Mitch Gerads
  • Something is Killing the Children Vol. 1 by James Tynion IV, Werther Dell’Edera

10. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy TV Series

  • Altered Carbon – Netflix
  • Lost In Space – Netflix Originals
  • Star Trek: Picard – CBS All Access
  • The Expanse – Amazon Prime
  • The Mandalorian – Disney+
  • The Witcher – Netflix
  • Watchmen – HBO

11. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Movie

  • Ad Astra by James Gray
  • Fast Color by Julia Hart
  • Joker by Todd Phillips
  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker by J. J. Abrams
  • Terminator: Dark Fate by Tim Miller
  • The Lion King by Jon Favreau

12. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy PC / Console Game

  • Borderlands 3 – Gearbox Software & 2k Games
  • Control – Remedy Entertainment & 505 Games
  • Death Stranding – Kojima Productions & Sony Interactive
  • Gears 5 – The Coalition & Xbox Game Studios
  • Half-Life: Alyx – Valve
  • Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order – Respawn Entertainment & Electronic Arts
  • The Outer Worlds – Obsidian Entertainment & Private Division

13. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Mobile Game

  • Arknights – Hypergryph, Yostar
  • Call of Duty: Mobile – TiMi Studios & Activision Games
  • Grindstone – Capybara Games Inc.
  • Manifold Garden – William Chyr Studio
  • Minecraft Earth – Mojang Studios & Xbox Game Studios
  • Mutazione – Die Gute Fabrik & Akupara Games

14. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Board Game

  • Forgotten Waters – Plaid Hat Games
  • Jaws of the Lion – Cephalofair Games
  • Power Rangers: Heroes of the Grid – Renegade Game Studios
  • Tapestry – Stonemaier Games
  • The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine – Kosmos
  • The King’s Dilemma – Horrible Guild Game Studio

15. Best Science Fiction or Fantasy Miniatures / Collectible Card / Role-Playing Game

  • Alien RPG – Free League Publishing
  • Battlestar Galactica – Starship Battles: Viper Mk. VII – Ares Games
  • Magic: The Gathering: Throne of Eldraine – Wizards of the Coast
  • Pathfinder Second Edition – Paizo Publishing
  • Spectaculars Core Game – Scratchpad Publishing
  • Warhammer Age of Sigmar: Warcry – Games Workshop

Best Series Hugo:
Eligible Series from 2020

SJW Credential Reading SFF Book (c) Can Stock Photo / vitalytitov

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the series believed to be eligible as of this writing for the 2021 Best Series Hugo next year *†.

Each series name is followed by the main author name(s) and the 2020-published work(s).

Feel free to add missing series and the name of the 2020-eligible work in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post.

I just ask that suggesters (1) first do a Find on author surname on this page, to check whether the series is already on the list, and (2) then make an effort to verify that a series does indeed have 3 volumes, that it has a 2020-published work, and that it has likely met the 240,000 word threshold. Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

Note that previous Hugo Administrators ruled that nominations for a series and one of its subseries will not be combined. Therefore, when nominating a subseries work, think carefully under which series name it should be nominated. If the subseries does not yet meet the 3-volume, 240,000 word count threshold, then the main series name should be nominated. If the subseries does meet that threshold, then the subseries name should probably be nominated. This will ensure that another subseries in the same universe, or the main series itself, would still be eligible next year if this subseries is a finalist this year.

* ineligible series are preceded by an asterisk

Read more…

2020 Splatterpunk Awards

Best-selling authors and Splatterpunk Awards founders Wrath James White and Brian Keene announced the winners of the 2020 Splatterpunk Awards on August 8 during the virtual KillerCon. The awards honor superior achievement for works published in 2019 in the sub-genres of Splatterpunk and Extreme Horror. An image of the award trophy, which might be a little strong for young viewers, is here.

BEST NOVEL

  • Lakehouse Infernal by Christine Morgan (Deadite Press)

BEST NOVELLA

  • One For the Road by Wesley Southard (Deadite Press)

BEST SHORT STORY

  • “Angelbait” by Ryan Harding (from The Big Book of Blasphemy, Necro Publications)

BEST COLLECTION

  • Dirty Rotten Hippies and Other Stories by Bryan Smith (Grindhouse Press)

BEST ANTHOLOGY

  • And Hell Followed, edited by Jarod Barbee and Patrick C. Harrison III (Death’s Head Press)

J.F. Gonzalez Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Edward Lee, author and editor

Honoring his significant contributions to the sub-genres of Splatterpunk and Extreme Horror. Previous recipients are David J. Schow and David G. Barnett.

Ignyte Awards Will Be
Presented at FIYAHCON

FIYAH Literary Magazine has announced the creation of the Ignyte Awards series.

The Awards seek to celebrate the vibrancy and diversity of the current and future landscapes of science fiction, fantasy, and horror by recognizing incredible feats in storytelling and outstanding efforts toward inclusivity of the genre.

Awards will be given in the following categories:

  • Best Novel – Adult
  • Best Novel – YA
  • Best in MG
  • Best Novella
  • Best Novelette
  • Best Short Story
  • Speculative Poetry
  • Critics Award
  • Best Fiction Podcast
  • Best Artist
  • Best Comics Team
  • Best Anthology/Collected Works
  • Best in Creative Nonfiction
  • The Ember Award for Unsung Contributions to Genre
  • Community Award for Outstanding Efforts in Service of Inclusion and Equitable Practice in Genre

Finalists will be picked by the FIYAHCON team and announced Monday, August 17. Voting on the awards will be open to the broader SFF community through September 11.

The winners will be announced during the inaugural FIYAHCON, being held October 17-18. FIYAHCON is a virtual convention centering the perspectives and celebrating the contributions of BIPOC in speculative fiction.

2020 Dagger Awards Shortlists

The Crime Writers’ Association (CWA) of the United Kingdom announced the shortlist for the 2020 Dagger Awards on August 6.

The winners of the 2020 Daggers will be named at an awards ceremony on October 22.

GOLD DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by an author of any nationality.

  • Claire Askew: What You Pay For (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
  • John Fairfax: Forced Confessions (Little, Brown)
  • Mick Herron: Joe Country (John Murray)
  • Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
  • Michael Robotham: Good Girl, Bad Girl (Sphere)

IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER

Eligible books in this category are thrillers set in any period and include, but are not limited to, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and action/adventure stories.

  • Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
  • Tom Chatfield: This is Gomorrah (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • AA Dhand: One Way Out (Bantam Press)
  • Eva Dolan: Between Two Evils (Raven Books)
  • David Koepp: Cold Storage (HQ)
  • Alex North: The Whisper Man (Michael Joseph)

JOHN CREASEY (NEW BLOOD) DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by a first-time author of any nationality.

  • Steph Cha: Your House Will Pay (Faber & Faber)
  • Samantha Downing: My Lovely Wife (Michael Joseph)
  • Philippa East: Little White Lies (HQ)
  • Robin Morgan-Bentley: The Wreckage (Trapeze)
  • Trevor Wood: The Man on the Street (Quercus Fiction)

SAPERE BOOKS HISTORICAL DAGGER

This award is for the best historical crime novel, set in any period up to 50 years prior to the year in which the award will be made.

  • Alis Hawkins: In Two Minds (The Dome Press)
  • Philip Kerr: Metropolis (Quercus Fiction)
  • SG MacLean: The Bear Pit (Quercus Fiction)
  • Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
  • Alex Reeve: The Anarchists’ Club (Raven Books)
  • Ovidia Yu: The Paper Bark Tree Mystery (Constable)

CRIME FICTION IN TRANSLATION DAGGER

This award is for a crime novel not originally written in English and which has been translated into English for UK publication.

  • Marion Brunet: Summer of Reckoning, translated by Katherine Gregor (Bitter Lemon Press)
  • Hannelore Cayre: The Godmother, translated by Stephanie Smee (Old Street Publishing)
  • K Ferrari: Like Flies from Afar, translated by Adrian Nathan West (Canongate Books)
  • Jorge Galán: November, translated by Jason Wilson (Constable)
  • Sergio Olguín: The Fragility of Bodies, translated by Miranda France (Bitter Lemon Press)
  • Antti Tuomainen: Little Siberia, translated by David Hackston (Orenda Books)

SHORT STORY DAGGER

This award is for any crime short story first published in the UK in English in a publication that pays for contributions, or broadcast in the UK in return for payment.

  • Jeffery Deaver: The Bully in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Paul Finch: The New Lad in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Christopher Fowler: The Washing in Invisible Blood, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
  • Lauren Henderson: #Me Too in Invisible Blood, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
  • Louise Jensen: The Recipe in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Syd Moore: Easily Made in 12 Strange Days of Christmas (Point Blank Press)

ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION

This award is for any non-fiction work on a crime-related theme by an author of any nationality.

  • Casey Cep: Furious Hours (William Heinemann)
  • Peter Everett: Corrupt Bodies (Icon Books)
  • Caroline Goode: Honour: Achieving Justice for Banaz Mahmod (Oneworld Publications)
  • Sean O’Connor: The Fatal Passion of Alma Rattenbury (Simon & Schuster)
  • Adam Sisman: The Professor and the Parson: A Story of Desire, Deceit and Defrocking (Profile Books)
  • Susannah Stapleton: The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective (Picador)

DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY

The Dagger in the Library is a prize for a body of work by an established crime writer who has long been popular with borrowers from libraries, and who has supported libraries and their users.

  • Christopher Brookmyre
  • Jane Casey
  • Alex Gray
  • Quintin Jardine

DEBUT DAGGER

A competition for the opening of a crime novel and synopsis, chosen by judges: bestselling author Leigh Russell, editor Stephanie Glencross (of Gregory and Company), Editorial Director at Bonnier Zaffre Katherine Armstrong and director of literary agency A.M. Heath and Co. Oli Munson.

  • Anna Caig: The Spae-Wife
  • Leanne Fry: Whipstick
  • Kim Hays: Pesticide
  • Nicholas Morrish: Emergency Drill
  • Josephine Moulds: Revolution Never Lies
  • Michael Munro: Bitter Lake

PUBLISHERS’ DAGGER

This prestigious Dagger is awarded annually to the Best Crime and Mystery Publisher of the Year.

  • Bitter Lemon Press
  • Harvill Secker
  • Head of Zeus
  • HQ
  • Michael Joseph
  • Orenda
  • Raven Books
  • Severn House

Huntington Library Creates
Octavia E. Butler Fellowship

Butler at Machu Picchu in 1985.

The Huntington Library has announced a new Octavia E. Butler Fellowship worth $50,000.

Butler was  the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur ‘genius’ award and the first African-American woman to win wide acclaim writing in that genre.

The Huntington received her papers in 2008, two years after her death. A 2018 article said the institution’s Octavia E. Butler Collection is one of the top two most actively researched archives at The Huntington.

The fellowship is open to —

… Applicants [who] may be working from a variety of disciplinary perspectives on the ideas and issues explored by Butler in her published works, ranging from speculative fiction through Afrofuturism to environmental studies and biotechnology, but preference may be given to candidates who intend to make extensive use of the Butler archive during their residency.

Applications will be accepted beginning Aug. 31, 2020, with a submission deadline of noon PST on November 16, 2020.  The tenure of the fellowship runs between nine and twelve months, beginning on June 1, 2021.

[Via Locus Online.]

Correction: Huggins Wins 2020 Baen Fantasy Adventure Award

Baen Books publisher Toni Weisskopf revealed the winners of the Baen Fantasy Adventure Award  at the start of the Baen Virtual Roadshow on August 2.

Due to the cancellation of NASFIC and the ongoing uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 virus, the Roadshow was broadcast live on Facebook.

The award winners, chosen from among the top ten finalists announced last month, were selected by Baen’s editorial staff. 

FIRST PLACE

  • “Humanslayer” by Scott Huggins

SECOND PLACE

  • “The Chilling Account of The Wolf-Bann of Krallenburg” by J. E. Tabor

THIRD PLACE

  • “Seidh” by Morgan Welch

Update 08/03/2020: File 770 apologizes for getting the order of finish reversed in its original post.

Ashley Wins 2020 Munsey Award

Munsey Award print. Art by David Saunders.

The winner of Pulpfest’s 2020 Munsey Award is Mike Ashley, author, bibliographer, critic, editor, and historian with a special expertise in the history of magazine science fiction, fantasy, and weird fiction.

The award is named for Frank A. Munsey, publisher of the first pulp magazine, and recognizes someone who has contributed to the betterment of the pulp community through disseminating knowledge, publishing, or other efforts to preserve and to foster interest pulp magazines. The winner is selected by a committee made up of all the living LamontMunsey, and Rusty Award recipients. The award is a fine art print created by David Saunders and published by Dan Zimmer of The Illustrated Press.

The award citation notes that Mike Ashley is the author or co-author of numerous works related to the pulps, science fiction, and fantasy. These include The Age Of The Storytellers: British Popular Fiction Magazines, 1880-1950, Algernon Blackwood: A Bio-Bibliography, “Blue Book — The Slick In Pulp Clothing,” The Gernsback Days: A Study In The Evolution Of Modern Science Fiction From 1911 To 1936, Monthly Terrors: An Index To The Weird Fantasy Magazines Published In The United States And Great Britain, Science Fiction, Fantasy And Weird Fiction Magazines,  The Supernatural Index: A Listing Of Fantasy, Supernatural, Occult, Weird And Horror Anthologies, and others. In 2000, Ashley began to publish his multi-part The History Of The Science-Fiction Magazines, beginning with The Time Machines: The Story Of The Science-Fiction Pulp Magazines From The Beginning To 1950. 

Ashley has also edited many anthologies and single-author collections, often drawing work from the pulps. He is currently part of a team compiling an index to the most important British popular fiction magazines published between 1880 and 1950, including all the British pulps.

In 2002, he received a Pilgrim Award from the Science Fiction Research Association in recognition of his distinguished contributions to the study of science fiction.

Pulpfest’s Mike Chomko posted these acceptance remarks from Mike Ashley:

It’s really great to win this award and I must thank everyone who voted for me. Especially as I feel such a long way from the epicentre of the pulp world, tucked away as I am in North Kent in England. Britain had its pulps, but nothing like those that appeared in the United States. In the early 1960s, when I started researching and collecting them, not only had the heyday of the pulps long passed, but it wasn’t easy to track them down in Britain.

Sure we had some dreadful British editions of American pulps that had appeared during the War and continued afterwards for some years, but these were often abridged versions and always looked second rate. If I was going to collect and understand the pulps properly, I had to collect the originals. However, in those long-ago, pre-internet days, doing so wasn’t that easy.

I now forget all of the dealers who helped me. There were some in Britain who had US pulps for sale — Ken Slater and Ken Chapman in particular. In the States, I was helped by Bob Madle, Bob Weinberg, and others. And bit by bit my collection grew.

However, my fascination was not just collecting pulps, but understanding their history. And it wasn’t just the science fiction or weird pulps that intrigued me. I suppose I have to thank or blame Sam Moskowitz for really setting my interest on fire, though it wasn’t just him. Tom Cockcroft in New Zealand was always enticing me with references to obscure magazines. Billy Pettitt said to me once that I was wasting my time researching the primary science fiction and fantasy magazines because they had already been covered. He told me that I ought to turn my attention to the rare British pulps like HUTCHINSON’S MYSTERY-STORY or the obscure PAN.

This was in the mid-sixties, and there was one small fanzine in particular that drove my collecting bug. That was LORE. Produced by Jerry Page and Jerry Burge, it made references to all kinds of lesser-known magazines — both British and American — and pushed for resources not only to index them, but to reprint them.

These days, with the wonderful work achieved by Adventure House, Black Dog Books, Steeger Books, and so many others, it’s relatively easy to acquire facsimile or reprinted issues of the old pulps. I never believed back in 1965 that I would have a complete reprint of THE THRILL BOOK – admittedly not as pulps in their original format — but no matter. It was so legendary that I doubted I’d ever see them. I remember trying to check out these early pulps at the British Library only to have my submission card returned time and again with the notation, ‘Destroyed in the War.’

In some ways, the comparative ease with which — thanks to the internet and reprint sources — you can now find so many of these early pulps has perhaps tainted some of that thrill of the chase. But for research purposes it’s brilliant. However, there is still so much that is not readily available. I wonder whether I’ll ever assemble a complete run of the British magazine, YES OR NO – not a pulp in looks, but definitely in content. This was another destroyed in the War, but in this case, very few seemed to have bothered to collect it. I may well have the biggest run of that magazine of anyone. However, I still have only 237 of its 798 issues, which is less than a third. It’s that kind of research that drives me on. The delight in discovering, reading, and researching such early magazines is still as vibrant in me now as it was almost sixty years ago.

Now I have another thrill, with the Munsey Award. How wonderful.

Many thanks.

Norma K Hemming Award
2020 Finalists

The Norma K Hemming Award, under the auspices of the Australian Science Fiction Foundation (ASFF), announced the 2020 finalists on August 2.

Designed to recognise excellence in the exploration of themes of race, gender, sexuality, class or disability in a published speculative fiction work, the jury of the Norma K Hemming Award considered dozens of entries published in 2019 across the long and short form categories, comprised of short fiction, novellas, novels, edited anthologies, collections, graphic novels and stage plays.

The finalists for the Short Fiction (stories up to 17,500 words) are:

  • “Like Ripples on a Blank Shore”, J S Breukelaar (Collision: Stories, Meerkat Press)
  • “The Mark”, Grace Chan (Verge 2019: Uncanny, Monash University Publishing)
  • “‘Scapes Made Diamond”, Shauna O’Meara (Interzone 280)
  • “The Promise of Saints”, Angela Slatter (A Miscellany of Death, Egaeus Press)
  • Winter’s Tale, Nike Sulway & Shauna O’Meara (Twelfth Planet Press)
  • “Rats”, Marlee Jane Ward (Kindred: 12 Queer #LoveOZYA Stories, Walker Books Australia)

The finalists for the Long Work category are:

  • Collision: Stories, J S Breukelaar (Meerkat Press)
  • From Here On, Monsters, Elizabeth Bryer (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Old Lie, Claire G Coleman (Hachette Australia)
  • Blackbirds Sing, Aiki Flinthart (CAT Press)
  • Ghost Bird, Lisa Fuller (University of Queensland Press)
  • Darkdawn, Jay Kristoff (HarperCollins Publishers)
  • The Trespassers, Meg Mundell (University of Queensland Press)

The Norma K Hemming Award winners will be presented at an online ceremony in the first week of September, which is both the tenth anniversary week of the inaugural award, and Norma K Hemming’s birth month.

[Based on a press release.]