2018 Niels Klim Award

The winners of this year’s Niels Klim Award were announced, and the trophies were presented in a ceremony at the annual Danish fantastika convention, Fantasticon, on September 23.

The prize, named for a character in Ludvig Holberg’s Nicolai Klimii iter Subterraneum [1741], is given annually for short science fiction publish in Danish for the first time the previous year.

The winners are:

Translated

  • No award

Novella

  • No award

Novellette

  • Ogel i fare (Ogel in Danger), Carolineskolens 4. klasse (4th grade) 2016/17, Lurifaks

Short story

  • Verdens rigeste mand og hans tro tjener Boris (The Richest Man in the World and his Faithful Servant Boris), Chr. Winther, Smspress

The list of nominees, in Danish, has links to translated English-language quotes.

The award is presented annually after nomination and voting among Danish science fiction readers. This was the seventh time the prize was given out. The nominees this year are a varied group of writers, new and more established, Danish and foreign.

The four categories together cover shorter science fiction texts (less than 40,000 words) published in Danish for the first time the previous year.

The award administration is mostly handled by Lise Andreasen (member of Science Fiction Cirklen among other qualifications), and her blog is the primary information source about the Niels Klim Prisen.

[Thanks to Lise Andreasen for the story.]

2018 BSFA Awards Nominations Open

The British Science Fiction Association invites its members to nominate for the 2018 BSFA Awards (see the official website for details).

Clare Boothby explains a major rules change that makes it possible now to nominate books published anywhere.

This year we’re making a change to the BSFA Award rules for Best Novel. To bring it into line with all the other awards, we are dropping the publication location requirement for novels. Previously novels were only eligible if they were published for the first time in the UK or Ireland (or solely in e-book format). From this year, novels are eligible in the year of their first publication, regardless of where they were published.

Because occasionally a book can still be hard to find in the UK when it’s only been published elsewhere, novels may also be eligible in the year of their first UK/Ireland publication, at the awards administrator’s discretion.

We’re making this change for several reasons, but in general terms we’re doing it to keep awards eligibility in line with the books that British fans are reading and talking about. Publishing availability has changed dramatically since the rule was written. Books published only in the US are now much more widely available in the UK, which means some books never get a formal UK publication even though they’re really easy to get hold of in the UK. Publishing models are also changing, and it’s getting harder and harder to tell what “counts” as UK publication.

And of course it isn’t the big names who are affected by this, which means that as a side-effect we’re narrowing our focus unnecessarily and ruling out some really great books, often by British authors or authors living and working in Britain. That’s the main motivation behind this change; we want to keep the novel award as relevant and interesting as the novels we’re all reading.

[Based on the press release.]

2018 Elgin Awards

The Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) has announced the winners of the 2018 Elgin Awards for best collections of speculative poetry published in the previous two years. Named after SFPA founder Suzette Haden Elgin, awards are given in two categories: best chapbook and best full-length book.

2018 Elgin Award Results:

Full-Length Book Category

First Place: Liberating the Astronauts • Christina M. Rau (Aqueduct Press, 2017)

Second Place: Satan’s Sweethearts • Marge Simon & Mary Turzillo (Weasel Press, 2017)

Third Place: Love Robot • Margaret Rhee (The Operating System, 2017)

Chapbook Category

First Place: A Catalogue of the Further Suns • F. J. Bergmann (Gold Line Press, 2017)

Second Place: Astropoetry • Christina Sng (Alban Lake, 2017)

Third Place: The Terraformers • Dan Hoy (Third Man Books, 2017)

This year’s Elgin Awards had 22 nominees in the chapbook category and 30 nominees in the full-length category, one of the largest years since the awards were first established in 2013.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association was established in 1978 and has an international membership representing over 19 nations and cultures including United States, Italy, Canada, Brazil, United Kingdom, Ireland, Romania, Poland, Denmark, Germany, France, Spain, Israel, South Africa, Singapore, Thailand, Laos, the Hmong, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand.

[Thanks to Josh Brown, 2018 Elgin Award chair, for the story.]

2018 Dwarf Stars Award Winners

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association announced the 2018 Dwarf Stars winner and other top finishers on September 16.

Winner

2nd Place

3rd Place (tie)

The award recognizes the best speculative poem of 1–10 lines published in the previous year, and is designed to honor excellent scifaiku, tanka, cinquains, and other types of short poems that tend to be overshadowed in SFPA’s Rhysling Award competition.

Also in contrast to the annual Rhysling Anthology, Dwarf Stars is an edited anthology. SFPA encourages poets, poetry readers, and editors are also encouraged to submit or suggest eligible poems to the Dwarf Stars editor. This year’s anthology is edited by Deborah P. Kolodji. The winner was determined by a vote of the members of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association.

[Via Locus Online.]

2018 Primetime Emmy Awards

These are the genre winners of the 70th annual primetime Emmys. (A complete list is here.)

Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special

USS Callister (Black Mirror)
Written by William Bridges and Charlie Brooker

Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones

Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Thandie Newton, Westworld 

Drama Series

Game of Thrones

Apply for 2018 Tiptree Fellowships

Applications are being taken for Tiptree Fellowships through October 31. Now in their fourth year, the fellowships provide $500 grants for “emerging creators who are changing the way we think about gender through speculative narrative.”

If you think that description could apply to you — even if you are not working in a format most people would recognize as the science fiction or fantasy genre — you are eligible to apply for a Fellowship. Tiptree Fellows can be writers, artists, scholars, media makers, remix artists, performers, musicians, or something else entirely; so far our Fellows have been creators of visual art, poetry, fiction, and games.

The Tiptree Fellowship is designed to provide support and recognition for the new voices who are making visible the forces that are changing our view of gender today. The Fellowship Committee particularly encourages applications from members of communities that have been historically underrepresented in the science fiction and fantasy genre and from creators who are creating speculative narratives in media other than traditional fiction. In keeping with the focus of the Tiptree Award, the selection committee is seeking projects that explore and expand understandings of gender, particularly in relationship to race, nationality, class, disability, sexuality, age, and other factors that set individuals or groups apart as “other.” Fellowship applicants do not need a professional or institutional affiliation, as the intention of the Fellowship program is to support emerging creators who lack institutional support for their work.

The complete guidelines are available on the Tiptree Award site: “How to Apply”.

Applicants are asked to write an answer to the question: “How are you working with speculative narrative to expand or explore our understanding of gender?”

We are open to broad understandings of “gender” and are especially interested in its intersections with race, nationality, class, disability, sexuality, and other categories of identification and structures of power.

Here we want you to tell us why your work is groundbreaking in the ways that the Tiptree Award honors: what’s speculative about it, and how you engage the complexities, intersections, and possibilities of gender in real and imagined worlds. Use this statement to tell us why we should be excited about supporting your work.

And they are asked what they will use the fellowship for.

Here we want to know why the monetary grant will be important for the particular project you plan to use it to help realize. Maybe it will go toward materials, travel for research, or the cost of presenting your work at a conference or exhibition. Maybe it will buy you time away from a job or other responsibilities so that you have time to focus on your creative work. We realize that $500 is a drop in the ocean for some kinds of projects, like films; maybe you will be using your fellowship as seed money, to help build up a larger sum you need to raise.

Best Editor
Long Form and Short Form Hugo:
Eligible Works from 2018

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the editors of works published for the first time in 2018.

These credits have been accumulated from Acknowledgments sections and copyright pages in works, as well as other sources on the internet.

Feel free to add missing 2018-original works and the name of their editors in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post. Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

PLEASE DON’T ADD GUESSES.

If you are able to confirm credits from Acknowledgments sections, copyright pages, or by contacting authors and/or editors, then go ahead and add them in comments. If you have questions or corrections, please add those also.

Authors, Editors, and Publishers are welcome to post in comments here, or to send their lists to jjfile770 [at] gmail [dot] com.

 

Long Form Editors

3.3.11: Best Editor Long Form. The editor of at least four (4) novel-length works primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy published in the previous calendar year that do not qualify as works under 3.3.10.

(Note that the Long Form Editors listed below may, or may not, be eligible — that is, have 4 qualifying works published in 2018)

John Joseph Adams

  • The City of Lost Fortunes by Bryan Camp, John Joseph Adams Books
  • Creatures of Want and Ruin by Molly Tanzer, John Joseph Adams Books
  • In the Night Wood by Dale Bailey, John Joseph Adams Books
  • The Robots of Gotham by Todd McAulty, John Joseph Adams Books
  • The Wild Dead by Carrie Vaughn, John Joseph Adams Books

Rebecca Brewer

  • Before Mars by Emma Newman, Gollancz

Emma Coode

  • Noumenon Infinity by Marina Lostetter, HarperVoyager

Mark Doten

  • Side Life by Steve Toutonghi, Soho Press

Carl Engle-Laird

  • Deep Roots by Ruthanna Emrys, Tor.com Publishing
  • State Tectonics by Malka Older, Tor.com Publishing

Bradley Englert

  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with Anna Jackson and James Long)

Moshe Feder

  • Skyward by Brandon Sanderson, Delacorte Press/Gollancz

Sheila Gilbert

  • Aliens Abroad by Gini Koch, DAW Books
  • Lady Henterman’s Wardrobe by Marshall Ryan Maresca, DAW Books
  • Night and Silence by Seanan McGuire, DAW Books
  • Outpost by W. Michael Gear, DAW Books
  • Tricks for Free by Seanan McGuire, DAW Books
  • The Way of the Shield by Marshall Ryan Maresca, DAW Books

Diana Gill

  • I Only Killed Him Once by Adam Christopher, Tor Books/Titan Books

Marcus Gipps

  • From Distant Stars by Sam Peters, Gollancz

Ana Grilo

  • The Ninety-Ninth Bride by Catherine Faris King, Books Smugglers Publishing (with Thea James)

Anne Lesley Groell

  • Into the Fire by Elizabeth Moon, Orbit/Del Rey

Jen Gunnels

  • Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport, Tor Books (with Elinor Mavor)
  • Semiosis by Sue Burke, Tor Books/Harper Voyager

Lee Harris

  • Alice Payne Arrives by Kate Heartfield, Tor.com Publishing
  • Outbreak by Melissa F. Olson, Tor.com Publishing

Alison Hennessey

  • The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton, Raven Books (UK title: The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle)

Brit Hvide

  • A Big Ship at the Edge of the Universe by Alex White, Orbit Books

Anna Jackson

  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with James Long and Bradley Englert)

Thea James

  • The Ninety-Ninth Bride by Catherine Faris King, Books Smugglers Publishing (with Ana Grilo)

Oliver Johnson

  • Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers, Harper Voyager/Hodder & Stoughton (with Anne Perry)

Phil Jourdan

  • Quietus by Tristan Palmgren, Angry Robot
  • The Dreaming Stars by Tim Pratt, Angry Robot

Sally Kim

  • The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch, Putnam/Headline (with Mark Tavani)

Justin Landon

  • The Armored Saint by Myke Cole, Tor.com Publishing
  • The Queen of Crows by Myke Cole, Tor.com Publishing
  • Witchmark by C.L. Polk, Tor Books

Rebecca Lloyd

  • An Argumentation of Historians by Jodi Taylor, Accent Press

James Long

  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with Anna Jackson and Bradley Englert)

Sam Matthews

  • The Synapse Sequence by Daniel Godfrey, Titan Books

Elinor Mavor

  • Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport, Tor Books (with Jen Gunnels)

Beth Meacham

  • If Tomorrow Comes by Nancy Kress, Tor Books
  • Memory’s Blade by Spencer Ellsworth, Tor.com Publishing
  • Terran Tomorrow by Nancy Kress, Tor Books

Patrick Nielsen Hayden

  • The Consuming Fire by John Scalzi, Tor Books
  • Dark State by Charles Stross, Tor Books
  • Head On by John Scalzi, Tor Books
  • The Labyrinth Index by Charles Stross, Tor.com Publishing

Jonathan Oliver

  • Revenant Gun by Yoon Ha Lee, Solaris

Julian Pavia

  • Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett, Crown Publishing

Anne Perry

  • Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers, Harper Voyager/Hodder & Stoughton (with Oliver Johnson)

Diana M. Pho

  • By Fire Above by Robin Bennis, Tor Books

Devi Pillai

  • The Stars Now Unclaimed by Drew Williams, Simon & Schuster

David Pomerico

  • Gunpowder Moon by David Pedreira, Harper Voyager

Gillian Redfearn

  • Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds, Orbit Books
  • Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch, Random Penguin

Jill Roberts

  • The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts, Tachyon

K.B. Spangler

  • The Wonder Engine by T. Kingfisher, Argyll

Mark Tavani

  • The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch, Putnam/Headline (with Sally Kim)

Cath Trechman

  • The Hidden World by Melinda M. Snodgrass, Titan Books

Rachel Winterbottom

  • One Way by S.J. Morden, Gollancz

Miriam Weinberg

  • Vengeful by V.E. Schwab, Tor Books/Titan Books

Navah Wolfe

  • European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman by Theodora Goss, Saga Press
  • Imposter Syndrome by Mishell Baker, Saga Press
  • Mutiny at Vesta by R.E. Stearns, Saga Press
  • Serpent in the Heather by Kay Kenyon, Saga Press
  • Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente, Saga Press

Betsy Wollheim

  • A Veil of Spears by Bradley P. Beaulieu, DAW Books

 

Short Form Editors

3.3.10: Best Editor Short Form. The editor of at least four (4) anthologies, collections or magazine issues (or their equivalent in other media) primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy, at least one of which was published in the previous calendar year.

Rasha Abdulhadi (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Sheree Renée Thomas and Erin Roberts)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

John Joseph Adams

  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, Mariner Books (reprint anthology) (with N.K. Jemisin)
  • Lightspeed Magazine 2018 (with Wendy N. Wagner)
  • Nightmare Magazine 2018 (with Wendy N. Wagner)

David Afsharirad

  • The Year’s Best Military & Adventure SF 4, Baen (reprint anthology)

Jen R. Albert

  • PodCastle 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali)

Scott H. Andrews

  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies 2018

Michele Barasso

Vajra Chandrasekera

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Catherine Krahe and Lila Garrott)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Neil Clarke

  • The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 3, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • Clarkesworld Magazine 2018, Wyrm Publishing
  • Clarkesworld Year Nine, Wyrm Publishing (reprint anthology)
  • The Final Frontier, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • Forever Magazine 2018, Wyrm Publishing

Andy Cox

  • Interzone 2018, TTA Press

Ellen Datlow

  • The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Ten, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • The Best of the Best Horror of the Year, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea, Night Shade Books (original anthology)
    • “Broken Record” by Stephen Graham Jones (short fiction)
    • “The Curious Allure of the Sea” by Christopher Golden (short fiction)
    • “Deadwater” by Simon Bestwick (short story)
    • “The Deep Sea Swell” by John Langan (short fiction)
    • “Fodder’s Jig” by Lee Thomas (short fiction)
    • “Haunt” by Siobhan Carroll a (short fiction)
    • “He Sings of Salt and Wormwood” by Brian Hodge (short fiction)
    • “A Moment Before Breaking” by A. C. Wise (short fiction)
    • “Saudade” by Steve Rasnic Tem (short fiction)
    • “A Ship of the South Wind” by Bradley Denton (short fiction)
    • “Shit Happens” by Michael Marshall Smith (short fiction)
    • “Sister, Dearest Sister, Let Me Show to You the Sea” by Seanan McGuire (short fiction)
    • “The Tryal Attract” by Terry Dowling (short fiction)
    • “The Whalers Song” by Ray Cluley (short fiction)
    • “What My Mother Left Me” by Alyssa Wong (short fiction)
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Gods, Monsters and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson, Tor.com (novella)
    • “A.I. and the Trolley Problem” by Pat Cadigan, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Breakwater” by Simon Bestwick, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Ghoul Goes West” by Dale Bailey, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Guile” by Ian McDonald, Tor.com (short story)
    • “The Heart of Owl Abbas” by Kathleen Jennings, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Meat And Salt And Sparks” by Rich Larson, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Our King and His Court ” by Rich Larson, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Played Your Eyes” by Jonathan Carroll, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Recoveries” by Susan Palwick, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Triquetra” by Kirstyn McDermott, Tor.com (short story)

S. B. Divya

  • Escape Pod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Mur Lafferty)

Gardner Dozois

  • The Book of Magic, Bantam/Harper Voyager (original anthology)
    • “The Biography of A Bouncing Boy Terror: Chapter Two: Jumping Jack in Love” by Ysabeau S Wilce (short fiction)
    • “Bloom” by Kate Elliott (short fiction)
    • “Community Service” by Megan Lindholm (short fiction)
    • “The Devil’s Whatever” by Andy Duncan (short fiction)
    • “Flint and Mirror” by John Crowley (short fiction)
    • “The Friends of Masquelayne The Incomparable” by Matthew Hughes (short fiction)
    • “The Governer” by Tim Powers (short fiction)
    • “Loft The Sorcerer” by Eleanor Arnason (short fiction)
    • “A Night at the Tarn House” by George R.R. Martin (short fiction)
    • “No Work of Mine” by Elizabeth Bear (short fiction)
    • “Song of Fire” by Rachel Pollack (short fiction)
    • “The Staff in the Stone” by Garth Nix (short fiction)
    • “Sungrazer” by Liz Williams (short fiction)
    • “Widow Maker” by Lavie Tidhar (short fiction)
    • “The Wolf and the Manticore” by Greg Van Eekhout (short fiction)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Fifth Annual Collection, St. Martin’s Griffin (reprint anthology)

Carl Engle-Laird

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Descent of Monsters by JY Yang, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Loss of Signal” by S.B. Divya, Tor.com (short story)
    • Stone Mad by Elizabeth Bear, Tor.com (novella) (with Beth Meacham)
    • Void Black Shadow by Corey J. White, Tor.com (novella)

Moshe Feder (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Legion: Lies of the Beholder by Brandon Sanderson, Tor Books/Gollancz (novella)

C.C. Finlay

  • The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction 2018, Spilogate, Inc.

Melissa Frain (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “The Last Banquet of Temporal Confections” by Tina Connolly, Tor.com (novelette)

Shawn Garrett

  • Pseudopod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Alex Hofelich)

Lila Garrott

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Catherine Krahe and Vajra Chandrasekera)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Ana Grilo

  • Book Smugglers Short Fiction (with Thea James)
    • Accelerants by Lena Wilson (novella)
    • “The Girl with the Frozen Heart” by Y. M. Pang (novelette)
    • A Glimmer of Silver by Juliet Kemp (novella)
    • Nussia by Michele Tracy Berger (novella)
    • “Running” by Itoro Udofia (novelette)
    • “When the Letter Comes” by Sara Fox (novelette)

Lee Harris

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Artificial Condition by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Atrocities by Jeremy C. Shipp, Tor.com (novella)
    • Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire, Tor.com (novella)
    • Binti: The Night Masquerade by Nnedi Okorafor, Tor.com (novella)
    • Exit Strategy by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Expert System’s Brother by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Queen of Crows by Myke Cole, Tor.com (novella)
    • Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • Taste of Wrath by Matt Wallace, Tor.com (novella)

Edwina Harvey

  • Matters Arising from the Identification of the Body by Simon Petrie, Peggy Bright Books (novella)

Alex Hofelich

  • Pseudopod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Shawn Garrett)

Rich Horton

  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2018, Prime Books (reprint anthology)

Justina Ireland

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Troy L. Wiggins and Brandon O’Brien)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Thea James

  • Book Smugglers 2018 (with Ana Grilo)
    • Accelerants by Lena Wilson (novella)
    • “The Girl with the Frozen Heart” by Y. M. Pang (novelette)
    • A Glimmer of Silver by Juliet Kemp (novella)
    • Nussia by Michele Tracy Berger (novella)
    • “Running” by Itoro Udofia (novelette)
    • “When the Letter Comes” by Sara Fox (novelette)

N.K. Jemisin (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, Mariner Books (reprint anthology) (with series editor John Joseph Adams)

Stephen Jones

  • Best New Horror #28, PS Publishing (reprint anthology)

Cristina Jurado

  • The Apex Book of World SF 5, Apex Publications (mixed reprint and original anthology) (with Lavie Tidhar)
    • “Scenes from the Life of an Autocrat” by Basma Abdel Aziz
    • “Our Dead World” by Liliana Colanzi
    • “You Will See the Moon Rise” by Israel Alonso (translation of “Verás crecer la luna”)
    • “The Seventh” by Eliza Victoria

Marguerite Kenner

  • Cast of Wonders 2018, Escape Artists, Inc.

Stephen King (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Flight or Fright, Hodder & Stoughton/Cemetery Dance (reprint anthology) (with Bev Vincent)

Catherine Krahe

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Lila Garrott and Vajra Chandrasekera)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Jonathan Laden

Mur Lafferty

  • Escape Pod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with S. B. Divya)

Justin Landon

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Warrior Within by Angus Mcintyre, Tor.com (novella)
    • War Cry by Brian Mcclellan, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Worth Her Weight in Gold” by Sarah Gailey, Tor.com (short story)

George R. R. Martin

  • Wild Cards: Low Chicago, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “A Beautiful Facade” by Mary Anne Mohanraj (novelette)
    • “A Bit of Dinosaur” by Paul Cornell (novelette)
    • “Down the Rabbit Hole” by Kevin Andrew Murphy (novelette)
    • “A Long Night at the Palmer House” by John Jos. Miller (novella)
    • “Meathooks on Ice” by Saladin Ahmed (novelette)
    • “The Motherf*cking Apotheosis of Todd Motherf*cking Taszycki” by Christopher Rowe (novelette)
    • “The Sister in the Streets” by Melinda M. Snodgrass (novelette)
    • “Stripes” by Marko Kloos (novella)
  • Wild Cards: Texas Hold’em, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “Beats, Bugs, and Boys” by Diana Rowland
    • “Bubbles and the Band Trip” by Caroline Spector
    • “Drop City” by David Anthony Durham
    • “Dust and the Darkness” by Victor Milan
    • “Is Nobody Going to San Antone?” by Walton Simons
    • “Jade Blossom’s Brew” by William F. Wu
    • “The Secret Life of Rubberband” by Max Gladstone
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “Evernight” by Victor Milán, Tor.com (novelette)
    • The Flight of Morpho Girl by Caroline Spector and Bradley Denton, Tor.com (novella)

Beth Meacham

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Stone Mad by Elizabeth Bear, Tor.com (novella) (with Carl Engle-Laird)

Melanie R. Meadors (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Hath No Fury, Outland Entertainment (original anthology)
    • “The Book of Rowe” by Carol Berg (short fiction)
    • “Burning” by Elaine Cunningham (short fiction)
    • “Casting On” by Philippa Ballantine (short fiction)
    • “Craft” by Lian Hearn (short fiction)
    • “A Dance with Death” by Marc Turner (short fiction)
    • “Echoes of Stone” by Elizabeth Vaughan (short fiction)
    • “A Hero of Grünjord” by Lucy A. Snyder (short fiction)
    • “Last of the Red Riders” by Django Wexler (short fiction)
    • “The Mark of a Mountain Poppy” by Erin M. Evans (short fiction)
    • “Pax Egyptica” by Dana Cameron (short fiction)
    • “Reconciling Memory” by Gail Z. Martin (short fiction)
    • “Riding Ever Southward, in the Company of Bees” by Seanan McGuire (short fiction)
    • “Rise of the Bonecrushers” by Eloise J. Knapp (short fiction)
    • “The Scion” by S.R. Cambridge (short fiction)
    • “A Seed Planted” by Carina Bissett (short fiction)
    • “She Keeps Crawling Back” by Delilah S. Dawson (short fiction)
    • “She Tore” by Nisi Shawl (short fiction)
    • “Snakeskin: A Mutant Files Story” by William C. Dietz (short fiction)
    • “Some Enchanted Evening” by Anton Strout (short fiction)
    • “Trench Witch” by M.L. Brennan (short fiction)
    • “The Unlikely Turncoat: A Genrenauts Short Story” by Michael R. Underwood (short fiction)
    • “A Wasteland of My God’s Own Making” by Bradley P. Beaulieu (short fiction)

Rebecca Moesta (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Fiction River: Wishes, WMG Publishing (original anthology)
    • “As Fast as Wishes Travel” by Dale Hartley Emery (short story)
    • “Blame It on the Ghosts” by Annie Reed (short story)
    • “Ellen Double Prime” by Alexandra Brandt (short story)
    • “Family, Fair and True” by Dayle A. Dermatis (short story)
    • “Granted” by Robert T. Jeschonek (short story)
    • “How I Became a Fairy Godmother” by Bonnie Elizabeth (short story)
    • “If Wishes Were Kisses” by Lesley L. Smith (short story)
    • “Movie Boy and Music Girl” by Ron Collins (short story)
    • “The Rock of Kansas” by Eric Kent Edstrom (short story)
    • “Starfish at Ebbtide” by Lisa Silverthorne (short story)
    • “True” by Leslie Claire Walker (short story)
    • “Turquoise Trail” by Diana Deverill (short story)
    • “Twin Wishes” by Jamie Ferguson (short story)
    • “Upon_a_Starship.pgm” by Brigid Collins (short story)
    • “What Alanna Wished, How, and Why” by Dave Raines (short story)
    • “A Winged Heart” by T. Thorn Coyle (short story)

David Thomas Moore

  • Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
  • Dracula: Rise of the Beast, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
  • Not So Stories, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
  • The True History of the Strange Brigade, Abaddon Books (original anthology)

Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali

  • PodCastle 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Jen R. Albert)

Ira Nayman (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Amazing Stories Short Fiction
    • “Captain Future in Love” by Allen Steele (short story)
    • “Harry’s Toaster” by Lawrence Watt Evans (short story)
    • “Beyond Human Measure” by Dave Creek (short story)
    • “Flight of an Arrow” by Shirley Meier (short story)
    • “Sister Solveig and Mr. Denial” by Kameron Hurley (short story)
    • “Foster Earth” by Julie E. Czerneda (short story)
    • “Slipping Time” by Paul Levinson (short story)
    • “When Angels Come Knocking” by Drew Hayden Taylor (short story)

Brandon O’Brien

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Justina Ireland and Troy L. Wiggins)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Marco Palmieri (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “No Flight Without the Shatter” by Brooke Bolander, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Only Harmless Great Thing” by Brooke Bolander, Tor.com (novelette)

Dominik Parisien (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Robots vs. Fairies (original anthology) (with Navah Wolfe)
    • “Adriftica” by Maria Dahvana Headley (novelette)
    • “All the Time We’ve Left to Spend” by Alyssa Wong (short story)
    • “The Blue Fairy’s Manifesto” by Annalee Newitz (short story)
    • “The Bookcase Expedition” by Jeffrey Ford (short story)
    • “Bread and Milk and Salt” by Sarah Gailey (short story)
    • “Build Me a Wonderland” by Seanan McGuire (short story)
    • “The Buried Giant” by Lavie Tidhar (short story)
    • “A Fall Counts Anywhere” by Catherynne M. Valente (novelette)
    • “Ironheart” by Jonathan Maberry (short story)
    • “Just Another Love Song” by Kat Howard (short story)
    • “Murmured Under the Moon” by Tim Pratt (short story)
    • “Ostentation of Peacocks” by Delilah S. Dawson [as Lila Bowen] (short story)
    • “Quality Time” by Ken Liu (novelette)
    • “Second to the Left, and Straight On” by Jim C. Hines (short story)
    • “Sound and Fury” by Mary Robinette Kowal (short story)
    • “Three Robots Experience Objects Left Behind from the Era of Humans for the First Time” by John Scalzi (short story)
    • “To a Cloven Pine” by Max Gladstone (short story)
    • “Work Shadow/Shadow Work” by Madeline Ashby (short story)

Diana M. Pho (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Barrow Will Send What It May by Margaret Killjoy, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèli Clark, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Into the Gray” by Margaret Killjoy, Tor.com (short story)
    • “The Need for Air” by Lettie Prell, Tor.com (short story)

Trevor Quachri

  • Analog Science Fiction & Fact 2018, Dell Magazines

Julia Rios

  • Fireside Magazine 2018, Fireside Fiction Company

Erin Roberts (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Rasha Abdulhadi and Sheree Renée Thomas)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

Jill Roberts (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Apocalypse Nyx by Kameron Hurley, Tachyon (collection)

Kristine Kathryn Rusch

  • Fiction River: Justice, WMG Publishing (original anthology)
    • “The Ball Breaker’s Summer Club” by Valerie Brook
    • “Best Served… Salted” by Lauryn Christopher
    • “Bone” by T. Thorne Coyle
    • “The Darks of Their Eyes” by Robert T. Jeschonek
    • “Domus Justice” by Michèle Laframboise
    • “Grace” by Michael Kowal
    • “Mercy Find Me” by Diana Deverell
    • “My Honor to Kill You” by Dan C. Duval
    • “The Night Takes You” by Leslie Claire Walker
    • “Pariah” by Louisa Swann
    • “A Pearl into Darkness” by Lisa Silverthorne
    • “Spoils” by Eric Kent Edstrom
    • “The Supporters in Panama City” by Brigid Collins
    • “Uncle Philbert” by Dory Crowe
    • “A Vulture Waits” by Rob Vagle
  • Pulphouse Magazine 2018, WMG Publishing (with Dean Wesley Smith)

William Schafer

  • The Dinosaur Tourist by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • DJStories by David J Schow, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • Father of Lies by K.J. Parker, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • A Voice in the Night by Jack McDevitt, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)

William Schafer and Yanni Kuznia

  • Subterranean Press Short Fiction
    • Phoresis by Greg Egan, Subterranean Press (novella)
    • The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard, Subterranean Press (novella)

Jason Sizemore

  • Apex Magazine 2018, Apex Publications

Dean Wesley Smith

  • Pulphouse Magazine 2018, WMG Publishing (with Kristine Kathryn Rusch)

Rashida J. Smith

  • GigaNotoSaurus Short Fiction
    • “The Final Charge of Mr. Electrico” by Scott Edelman (short story)
    • “Through the Eye of the Needle” by A. J. Fitzwater (short story)
    • “Traces of Us” by Vanessa Fogg (short story)
    • “The Tale of the Ive-ojan-akhar’s Death” by Alex Jeffers (novelette)
    • “The Wait Is Longer Than You Think” by Adrian Simmons (novelette)
    • “Balloon Man” by Shiv Ramdas (novelette)
    • “The Singing Wind and the Golden Hour” by Nicole Feldringer (short story)
    • “Chrysalis in Sunlight” by Sarena Ulibarri (short story)
    • “The Day Beth Leather Shot the Moon, As Told by Rosemary Bonebreak” by Sarah McGill (short story)

Melinda M. Snodgrass

  • Wild Cards: Low Chicago, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with George R.R. Martin)
    • “A Beautiful Facade” by Mary Anne Mohanraj (novelette)
    • “A Bit of Dinosaur” by Paul Cornell (novelette)
    • “Down the Rabbit Hole” by Kevin Andrew Murphy (novelette)
    • “A Long Night at the Palmer House” by John Jos. Miller (novella)
    • “Meathooks on Ice” by Saladin Ahmed (novelette)
    • “The Motherf*cking Apotheosis of Todd Motherf*cking Taszycki” by Christopher Rowe (novelette)
    • “The Sister in the Streets” by Melinda M. Snodgrass (novelette)
    • “Stripes” by Marko Kloos (novella)
  • Wild Cards: Texas Hold’em, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “Beats, Bugs, and Boys” by Diana Rowland
    • “Bubbles and the Band Trip” by Caroline Spector
    • “Drop City” by David Anthony Durham
    • “Dust and the Darkness” by Victor Milan
    • “Is Nobody Going to San Antone?” by Walton Simons
    • “Jade Blossom’s Brew” by William F. Wu
    • “The Secret Life of Rubberband” by Max Gladstone

David Steffen

  • Diabolical Plots Short Fiction
    • “9 Things Mainstream Media Got Wrong About the Ansaj Incident” by Willem Myra (short story)
    • “Artful Intelligence” by G.H. Finn (short story)
    • “Brooklyn Fantasia” by Marcy Arlin (short story)
    • “Crimson Hour” by Jesse Sprague (short story)
    • “The Efficacy of Tyromancy Over Reflective Scrying Methods in Divining Colleagues’ Coming Misfortunes, A Study by Cresivar Ibraxson, Associate Magus, Wintervale University” by Amanda Helms (short story)
    • “Giant Robot and the Infinite Sunset” by Derrick Boden (short story)
    • “Glass in Frozen Time” by M.K. Hutchins (short story)
    • “Graduation in the Time of Yog-Sothoth” by James Van Pelt (short story)
    • “Her February Face” by Christie Yant (short story)
    • “Jesus and Dave” by Jennifer Lee Rossman (short story)
    • “Medium Matters” by R.K. Duncan (short story)
    • “Six Hundred Universes of Jenny Zars” by Wendy Nikel (short story)
    • “Soft Clay” by Seth Chambers (short story)
    • “Tank!” by John Wiswell (short story)
    • “The Vegan Apocalypse: 50 Years Later” by Benjamin A. Friedman (short story)
    • “What Monsters Prowl Above the Waves” by Jo Miles (short story)
    • “Withholding Judgment Day” by Ryan Dull (short story)
  • Diabolical Plots Year Four (anthology which includes all of the above, plus: )
    • “The Coal Remembers What It Was” by Paul R. Hardy (short story)
    • “The Dictionary For Dreamers” by Cislyn Smith (short story)
    • “The Divided Island” by Rhys Hughes (short story)
    • “The Fisher in the Yellow Afternoon” by Michael Anthony Ashley (short story)
    • “For the Last Time, It’s Not a Ray Gun” by Anaea Lay (short story)
    • “The Hammer’s Prayer” by Benjamin C. Kinney (short story)
    • “Heaven For Everyone” by Aimee Ogden (short story)
    • “How Rigel Gained a Rabbi (Briefly)” by Benjamin Blattberg (short story)
    • “The Last Death” by Sahara Frost (short story)
    • “Local Senior Celebrates Milestone” by Matthew Claxton (short story)
    • “The Man Whose Left Arm Was a Cat” by Jennifer Lee Rossman (short story)
    • “The Memory Cookbook” by Aaron Fox-Lerner (short story)
    • “Pumpkin and Glass” by Sean R. Robinson (short story)
    • “Still Life With Grave Juice” by Jim Moss (short story)

Jonathan Strahan

  • The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year: Volume Twelve, Solaris (reprint anthology)
  • Infinity’s End, Solaris (original anthology)
    • “Death’s Door” by Alastair Reynolds (novelette)
    • “Foxy and Tiggs” by Justina Robson (short fiction)
    • “Intervention” by Kelly Robson (short fiction)
    • “Kindred” by Peter Watts (short fiction)
    • “Last Small Step” by Stephen Baxter (short fiction)
    • “Longing for Earth” by Linda Nagata (short fiction)
    • “Nothing Ever Happens on Oberon” by Paul J. McAuley (short fiction)
    • “Once on the Blue Moon” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (short fiction)
    • “A Portrait of Salai” by Hannu Rajaniemi (short fiction)
    • “Prophet of the Roads” by Naomi Kritzer (short fiction)
    • “Swear Not by the Moon” by Seanan McGuire (short fiction)
    • “The Synchronist” by Fran Wilde (short fiction)
    • “Talking to Ghosts at the Edge of the World” by Lavie Tidhar (short fiction)
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Black Helicopters by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Million by Karl Schroeder, Tor.com (novella)
    • Time Was by Ian McDonald, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Black Friday” by Alex Irvine, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Grace’s Family” by James Patrick Kelly, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Nearest” by Greg Egan, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Nine Last Days on Planet Earth” by Daryl Gregory, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Yiwu” by Lavie Tidhar, Tor.com (short story)

Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas

  • Uncanny Magazine 2018

Sheree Renée Thomas (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Rasha Abdulhadi and Erin Roberts)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

Lavie Tidhar

  • The Apex Book of World SF 5, Apex Publications (mixed reprint and original anthology) (with Cristina Jurado)
    • “Scenes from the Life of an Autocrat” by Basma Abdel Aziz
    • “Our Dead World” by Liliana Colanzi
    • “You Will See the Moon Rise” by Israel Alonso (translation of “Verás crecer la luna”)
    • “The Seventh” by Eliza Victoria

E. Catherine Tobler

  • Shimmer Short Fiction
    • “An Incomplete Catalogue of Miraculous Births, or Secrets of the Uterus Abscondita” by Rebecca Campbell (short story)
    • “Black Fanged Thing” by Sam Rebelein (short story)
    • “Bleeding from the Shadows” by David Rees-Thomas (short story)
    • “Faint Voices, Increasingly Desperate” by Anya Johanna DeNiro (short story)
    • “Gone to Earth” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Held” by Ian O’Reilly (short story)
    • “If a bear…” by Kathrin Köhler(short story)
    • “The Imitation Sea” by Lora Gray (short story)
    • “Me, Waiting for Me, Hoping for Something More” by Dee Warrick (short story)
    • “Milkteeth” by Kristi DeMeester (short story)
    • “The Passenger” by Emily Lundgren (short story)
    • “Rapture” by Meg Elison (short story)
    • “They Have a Name for That” by Sara Beitia (short story)
    • “The Triumphant Ward of the Railroad and the Sea” by Sara Saab (short story)
    • “What the Skeleton Detective Tells You (while you picnic)” by Katherine Kendig (short story)
    • “You, in Flux” by Alexis A. Hunter (short story)

Ann VanderMeer

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “The Kite Maker” by Brenda Peynado, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Under The Spinodal Curve” by Hanuš Seiner, Tor.com (short story)
    • “You Know How the Story Goes” by Thomas Olde Heuvelt, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Where Would You Be Now?” by Carrie Vaughn, Tor.com (novelette)

Bev Vincent (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Flight or Fright, Hodder & Stoughton/Cemetery Dance (reprint anthology) (with Stephen King)

Wendy N. Wagner

  • Lightspeed Magazine 2018 (with John Joseph Adams)
  • Nightmare Magazine 2018 (with John Joseph Adams)

Ian Whates

  • Steampunk International, NewCon Press (original anthology)
    • “The Athenian Dinner Party” by Derry O’Dowd (short fiction)
    • “Augustine” by J. S. Meresmaa (short fiction)
    • “The Cylinder Hat” by Anne Leinonen (short fiction)
    • “The Desert Spider” by Pedro Cipriano (short fiction)
    • “Heart of Stone” by Diana Pinguicha (short fiction)
    • “Reckless Engineering” by Jonathan Green (short fiction)
    • “Seasons of Wither” by George Mann (short fiction)
    • “Videri Quam Esse” by Anton Stark (short fiction)
    • “The Winged Man Isaac” by Magdalena Hai (short fiction)

Troy L. Wiggins

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Justina Ireland and Brandon O’Brien)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Sheila Williams

  • Asimov’s Science Fiction 2018, Dell Magazines

Navah Wolfe (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Robots vs. Fairies (original anthology) (with Dominik Parisien)
    • “Adriftica” by Maria Dahvana Headley (novelette)
    • “All the Time We’ve Left to Spend” by Alyssa Wong (short story)
    • “The Blue Fairy’s Manifesto” by Annalee Newitz (short story)
    • “The Bookcase Expedition” by Jeffrey Ford (short story)
    • “Bread and Milk and Salt” by Sarah Gailey (short story)
    • “Build Me a Wonderland” by Seanan McGuire (short story)
    • “The Buried Giant” by Lavie Tidhar (short story)
    • “A Fall Counts Anywhere” by Catherynne M. Valente (novelette)
    • “Ironheart” by Jonathan Maberry (short story)
    • “Just Another Love Song” by Kat Howard (short story)
    • “Murmured Under the Moon” by Tim Pratt (short story)
    • “Ostentation of Peacocks” by Delilah S. Dawson [as Lila Bowen] (short story)
    • “Quality Time” by Ken Liu (novelette)
    • “Second to the Left, and Straight On” by Jim C. Hines (short story)
    • “Sound and Fury” by Mary Robinette Kowal (short story)
    • “Three Robots Experience Objects Left Behind from the Era of Humans for the First Time” by John Scalzi (short story)
    • “To a Cloven Pine” by Max Gladstone (short story)
    • “Work Shadow/Shadow Work” by Madeline Ashby (short story)

Jane Yolen

  • Nebula Awards Showcase 2018, Pyr (reprint anthology)

Shimmer Program / Storycom Offers Two Grants to Send Chinese Conrunners to Dublin 2019

Once again Storycom is encouraging Chinese fans to take an active part in the Worldcons — with its third Worldcon Attending Fund for Chinese Fans, offering two grants for Chinese conrunners to attend Dublin 2019.

In order to encourage Chinese fans to take an active part in Worldcons and enhance the communication between Chinese and international fandom, Storycom sets up this Worldcon Attending Fund under the scheme of Shimmer Program. Two active Chinese fans will be selected and granted RMB 10,000 each, for their attendance in and work for Dublin 2019 – An Irish Worldcon, which will be held in Dublin in August 2019. The beneficiaries should buy attending memberships for Dublin 2019, book their trip, as well as apply for visa by themselves, with the help of Storycom. The beneficiaries should also volunteer to work for Dublin 2019, be administrators of the future Worldcon Attending Fund and promise to take active part in attending and organizing both domestic and international science fiction activities in the future.

Some of the Shimmer Program grant eligibility requirements are:

  • The applicant must be a Chinese citizen and live in mainland China.
  • The applicant should promise that he/she will help with future Chinese Worldcon bid if there is any.
  • The applicant’s English proficiency should meet the requirements of working for Worldcon 76.

Judging the applications will be . Colin Zhang, the winner of Worldcon 75 Attending Funding (2017) & Hospitality Deputy Division Head of Worldcon 75, and Tammy Coxen, Division Head of Member and Staff Services of Dublin 2019.

This year’s winners, Sharon Shi and Mackenzie Lin, attended and worked on Worldcon 76. Their travel reports are in Chinese — but illustrated with many photos from the con.

Full requirements and application guidelines are available at the link.

[Thanks to Regina Kanyu Wang for the story.]

2018 National Toy Hall of Fame Finalists

The 2018 finalists for the National Toy Hall of Fame have been announced and they include 2 genre related toys:

  • Masters of the Universe Toys
  • Tickle Me Elmo

The entire list of nominees follows:

  • American Girl Dolls

Created in 1986 by educator and newscaster Pleasant Rowland, the 18-inch American Girl dolls (and their accompanying books) explore America’s social and cultural history. Each doll comes with a unique narrative that fits her era, such as Molly McIntire, who is waiting for her father to return home from World War II. The Pleasant Company released the My American Girl line of dolls in 1995 (originally under the name American Girl Dolls of Today) and designed them to look like their owners.

  • Chalk

Historians believe that the earliest people played and created with chalk. Paleolithic art executed in chalk has been found in the French Pyrenees, Spain, Italy, and Russia, among other places. Europeans first used chalk for street art in the 16th century, paving the way for the popularity of sidewalk chalk. Great masterpieces, clever doodles, educational lessons, and games such as tic-tac-toe and hopscotch, have all been brought to life with a simple stick of chalk.

  • Chutes and Ladders

Chutes and Ladders is based on an ancient Indian game called snakes and ladders. Snakes and ladders came to England in 1892, and it taught players moral lessons as they progressed to the finish, aided by virtues (ladders) and hindered by vices (snakes). Milton Bradley introduced the game—minus many of the moral lessons—to American audiences in 1943 under the more approachable name Chutes and Ladders.

  • Fisher-Price Corn Popper

Fisher-Price introduced the Corn Popper in 1957, calling it an amusement device for young children. Parents quickly discovered that by pushing the device, children could strengthen gross motor skills. The bright, flying balls and popping sound helped to stimulate the senses, promoting curiosity and discovery.

  • Magic 8 Ball

Introduced in 1946, the Magic 8 Ball allows users to flirt harmlessly with fortune-telling. Users pose questions, shake the cue ball, and then read one of 20 answers that float to the surface at the bottom of the ball—ranging from “ask again later” and “signs point to yes,” to simply, “no.” Millions of Magic 8 Balls have been sold since its introduction more than 70 years ago.

  • Masters of the Universe Toys

The Master of the Universe line of action figures, which includes the iconic He-Man, traces its popularity to maker Mattel’s use of comic books, television, and the big screen. The cartoon series He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, which ran from 1983 to 1985, created a cohesive, fantasy world that allowed Mattel to introduce new characters and new toys to the line. Over the years, Mattel has paired the brand with everything from toothbrushes to sleeping bags.

  • Pinball

With their roots tracing back to the 18th-century French parlor table game called bagatelle, modern mechanical-action pinball machines are fast-paced games that challenge players to use flippers to aim, control, and fire steel balls across a playfield filled with a maze of ramps and obstacles. Over the last century, pinball became common in bars, amusement parks, arcades, restaurants, family fun centers, and other public places.

  • Sled

Sleds have been around since ancient times and used largely as functional tools to haul stones or to help armies to cross icy terrain. Over the centuries, people discovered that they could also be devices for fun. In the 1800s, technology allowed American companies to mass produce the first “clipper” sleds, and the English introduced the first skeleton bobsled in 1892. The “Flexible Flyer” appeared in the early 1900s. Though altered by materials and technology over the years, the sled remains a wintertime staple.

  • Tic-Tac-Toe

Games that use a three-by-three square board have been around for thousands of years and have been discovered scratched into ancient Egyptian roof riles. Tic-tac-toe traces its origins to those early games and has been known by various names throughout history. The British called it “noughts and crosses;” the Irish “Xs and Os.” Tic-tac-toe was also one of the first games programmed into a computer in 1952, making it one of the first video games.

  • Tickle Me Elmo

Tickle Me Elmo took the 1996 holiday season by storm and became a worldwide phenomenon. Invented by Ron Dubren and Greg Hyman, Tickle Me Elmo combined the appeal of Sesame Street’s stand-out character with sophisticated technology that allowed the plush figure to emulate the experience of being tickled. It related to the most basic elements of play—anticipation, surprise, and pleasure.

  • Tudor Electric Football

Tudor’s Electric Football operates by means of an electromagnetic motor causing the playing “field” to vibrate. Special stands under tiny plastic players propel them, sometimes toward the proper end zones. Tudor’s game proved so popular in the 1960s that rival firms soon made similar games, but Tudor continued to dominate the electronic football game market through an official license with NFL teams, as well as continual product innovations. This year it celebrates its 70th anniversary.

  • Uno

Created in 1971, Uno (Spanish and Italian for “one”) belongs to the shedding family of card games in which players seek to dispose of the cards in their hands. Its fixed rule system makes it easy to learn and quick to play. Creative branding and themed variations — such as Elvis Uno, Disney Princess Uno, and Dr. Who – Uno has helped the game to sell steadily for more than four decades.

[Thanks to Mike Kennedy for the story.]