The Zine Artists Online Museum

saarahonourrole36Many notable fanzine artists have banded together to present exhibits of their finest work at The Zine Artists, where they hope others soon will join them.

Here are high-resolution scans of great cover art unimpaired by cheap paper repro, faneds’ peculiar choices of colored paper, or massive blots of zine title typography. Pristine! At last, no barriers between the artist and the audience.

Already available are dozens and dozens of examples of the funny and beautiful work by —

Taral Wayne forestalls the obvious question —

The first thing you will notice is how terribly incomplete the list of artists is. “Where are Jeanne Gomoll,” you may ask, or “Jack Wiedenbeck, Randy Bathurst, or David Vereschagin?” The answer is that it will take time to track these artists down and contact them.

Taral has also penned a detailed history of the evolution of fanzine art – including his lament about the current state of affairs:

Then, of course, came the digital age, which changed everything.  No longer was it necessary to print anything at all to publish a fanzine.  Fan editors could  manipulate words and images directly on the screen, and distribute them in whatever file format was convenient.  It was no longer necessary to limit illustrations in any way.  Colour became almost mandatory.   Photographs were a breeze.  Any image that was already digitized was fair game to import into your document.  You could search the entire globe, through the Internet, for the exact image you wanted.  In effect, fanartists became redundant.

The golden age of fanzine art represented here never really seems to have been accompanied by a golden age of appreciation for the artists. In every era there have been justifiable complaints that the artists did not receive enough egoboo to “sustain life as we know it.” So take advantage of this chance to leave an appreciative comment in The Zine Artists chat section!

Pratchett’s Tuckerizations

The late Terry Pratchett enjoyed a great reputation as a fan-friendly pro who sometimes drew inspiration from those he talked to at cons, while Tuckerizing others for charity.

Tuckerization — using a person’s real name in a science fiction story as an in-joke – is derived from Wilson Tucker, the author who made the practice famous.

Tom Meserole recalls, “My wife was Tuckerized in the novel Night Watch as ‘Lady Roberta Meserole, international woman of mystery, but her friends call her Bobbi.’ I also got a passing mention in the same novel.” Tom’s name was given to her cat.

Tom won the Tuckerization rights at a charity auction during a St. Louis convention where Pratchett was a guest of honor. People like to joke that the auction was for one Tuckerization but Terry threw in the cat for free….

Pratchett fans have spotted these other Tuckerizations:

Follett paid £2,200 to charity for his Discworld appearance in Night Watch, although as Dave Langford writes in Starcombing

He publicly expressed hopes that he’d appear as a giant. Instead, Terry Pratchett introduced the sinister Doctor Follett, past head of the Assassins’ Guild (‘Is that his own hair?’). Type-casting, no doubt.

Other fans are certain (with good reason) they made anonymous appearances in Pratchett’s work.

Perdita Nit

Perdita Nit

Magrat Garlick wears my jewelry,” says Sue Mason. “Terry was impressed at breakfast at some convention when I turned up with full silver jewelry, no makeup, no hair do, but full jewelry and he dragged me the length of an Eastercon dealer room to show me the Clarecraft Perdita Nit, as apparently he had described me to the sculptor and they had done a splendid job.”

“Some of the antics by the post grads in the high energy magic department are apparently based on a late night slightly alcohol fueled discussion Terry, I and a couple if others had about games we played with radars, missile systems and other electronics,” says Mike Rennie. “Terry used to make toast on resistor arrays for example.”

Rotsler Award Display at Loscon

Rotsler Award display at Loscon 41 -- past winners. Photo by Kenn Bates.

Rotsler Award display at Loscon 41 — past winners. Photo by Kenn Bates.

At Loscon 41 over Thanksgiving Weekend in November there was a display in the Art Show of cartoons and illos by Rotsler Award winners. One of the panels was devoted to the award’s history, and the other to work by its 2014 winner Sue Mason.

The display was curated by John Hertz. Thanks to Kenn Bates for these photographs.

Sue Mason Wins 2014 Rotsler Award

Illustration by Sue Mason. Published in File 770 #139 and elsewhere.

Illustration by Sue Mason. Published in File 770 #139 and elsewhere.

Sue Mason from the United Kingdom has won the 2014 Rotsler Award, given for long-time artistic achievement in amateur publications of the science fiction community. Established in 1998, the award carries an honorarium of US$300.

Mason is a widely-published pen-and-ink artist who is particularly well-known for her activity in the British fanzine Plokta. Her illustrations are whimsical, humorous and richly-detailed.

Some of her best artwork can be seen in the chapbook I Want to Be a Celtic Death Goddess When I Grow Up [PDF file].

She is also accomplished at pyrography, the process of producing designs by burning them onto a surface, generally wood, leather or paper.

Mason is a two-time winner of the Best Fan Artist Hugo. She has won the Nova Award for Best Fan Artist seven times.

The Rotsler Award is sponsored by the Southern California Institute for Fan Interests, a non-profit corporation, hosts of the 2006 Worldcon. The award is named for the late Bill Rotsler, the talented and prolific fanartist. Claire Brialey, Mike Glyer, and John Hertz served as this year’s judges.

The award was formally announced on Saturday, November 29, 2014 at Loscon 41. An exhibit honoring Mason’s work was displayed in the Art Show.

For more about the Rotsler Award, visit www.scifiinc.org/rotsler/. Samples of Mason’s work will be posted shortly.

2009 Nova Awards: Full Results

Steve Green has distributed the full voting statistics for the 2009 Nova Awards announced at last weekend’s Novacon in Nottingham, UK. Banana Wings, Claire Brialey and Sue Mason took top honors.

The Nova Awards are for achievement in British sf fanzines as voted by members of the convention able to “demonstrate a basic knowledge of current fanzines.”

Best fanzine:  1, Banana Wings (30 points); 2, Journey Planet (24); 3, Head (20); 4, Prolapse / Relapse (18); 5, Plokta, Quasiquote (11); 7, No Sin But Ignorance (7); 8, The Descent of Fan (6); 9, Lost in Space (3); 10, Ansible, Procrastinations (2), 12, The Banksoniain, Critical Wave (1).
 
Best fan writer:  1, Claire Brialey (26 points); 2, James Bacon (15); 3, Doug Bell (14); 4, Mark Plummer (11); 5, Dave Langford (9); 6, Christina Lake (8); 7, Sandra Bond, Peter Weston (7); 9, Max (5); 10, Greg Pickersgill (4); 11, John Nielsen Hall (3); 12, John Coxon, Alison Scott, Nicholas Whyte (2); 15, Caroline Mullan, Yvonne Rowse, Alan Sullivan, Ian Williams (1).
 
Best fan artist:  1, Sue Mason (13 points*); 2, Alison Scott (13*);  3, John Toon (12); 4, Steve Jeffrey (8); 5, Steve Green (7); 6, D West (6); 7, ATom (5); 8, Clarrie O’Callaghan (4); 9, Dave Hicks (3).

[*Although Sue Mason and Alison Scott tied both for points and first-place votes, Sue received more second-place votes.]