2021 Rhysling Award Nominees

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has finalized its 2021 Rhysling Award candidates. One hundred six members nominated.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words.

SFPA members have until June 15 to vote on the winners.

Short Poems (103 poems)
“Summer Time(lessness)” • Linda D. Addison • Star*Line 43.4
“Timegeddon” •  Francis Wesley Alexander • Illumen, Spring
“The Void Blends in Your Hands” • Carmen Lucía Alvarado • Utopia Science Fiction, February
“The Tree Of Eyes” • Colleen Anderson • Literary Hatchet 26
“They Made My Face” • Sara Backer • Silver Blade 47
“Sealskin Reclaimed” • Alison Bainbridge • Glitchwords 2
“a siren whispered in my ear one night” • Ashley Bao • Arsenika 7
“Chrono-Man” • F. J. Bergmann • Polu Texni, May 11
“Lesser Eternity” • F. J. Bergmann • Survision Magazine 6
“Chronovisor Wanted” • Robert Borski • Star*Line 43.1
“The Monster Maker” • Bruce Boston • Silver Blade 45
“When Change Comes” • Karen Bovenmyer • Arcana: Story
“The Edge of Galaxy NGC 4013” • Warren Brown • Speculative North 3
“He Sold What He Had Left” • Diane Callahan • Speculative North 1
“Three Triolets” • Anna Cates • Strange Horizons, 7 December
“Mrs. Housekeeper” • Beth Cato • Eye To The Telescope 35
“The Luck Eaters” • Beth Cato & Rhonda Parrish • Star*Line 43.3
“Post-Obit Cautionary Tale” • G. O. Clark • Tales From the Moonlight Path, July
“Zodiac Girl” • Carolyn Clink • Eye to the Telescope 36
“Back Story” • David Clink • Strange Horizons, 12 September 2020
“The dead couple of Blenheim” • William Clunie • Dreams and Nightmares 116
“an alien axiom” • Gerald L. Coleman • Star*Line 43.4
“Mouthing off” • PS Cottier • Monstrous (IP, Brisbane, Australia)
“Visit to Poe’s House” • Cynthia Cozette •  2020 SFPA Halloween Poetry Page
“The Memory of Summer” • Jennifer Crow • Polu Texni, May 31
“The Old God Dies” • Jennifer Crow • Liminality 24
“The Man with the Corpse on His Shoulders” • James Cushing • Rattle, October 1, 2020
“Isotropical” • d’Ores&Deja • Analog, July/August
“A Hand Against My Window” • Deborah L. Davitt • 34 Orchard 1
“A Touch of Lightning in the Soul” • Deborah L. Davitt • Abyss & Apex 73
“The Witch’s Cat” • Deborah L. Davitt • Eye to the Telescope 38
“Beneath the Fullest Moon” • Ashley Dioses • Midnight Under the Big Top, ed. Brian James Freeman (Cemetery Dance Publications)
“Disassembly at auction” • Robin Wyatt Dunn • Mobius: The Journal of Social Change 31:4
“Ghazal” • Joshua Gage • Silver Blade 47 (permission declined)
“Dragons Guard Our Family Fortune” • Adele Gardner • Star*Line 43.2
“Last Contact” • Jean-Paul L. Garnier • Poetry Super Highway, December 28
“The Mollusk God” • Maxwell Ian Gold • Space & Time Magazine 139
“Tree Limbs Block the Road” • Patricia Gomes • Wicked Women: An Anthology by New England Horror Writers, ed. Trisha Wooldridge
“Lucky & His Dad” • Alan Ira Gordon • Illumen Spring
“The Crib” • Vince Gotera • Making the Novel, August
“A Soldier Writes His Wife” • Vince Gotera • Ribbons 16:2
“First Contact“ • Robin Rose Graves • Simultaneous Times 6
“Teddy Bear Diner” • Michael H. Hanson • Android Girl and Other Sentient Speculations (Three Ravens Publishing)
“Hungry Ghost” • Millie Ho • Uncanny 33
“Ignorance, my prophylactic” • Akua Lezli Hope •  Eye to the Telescope 38
“Dolly Waits” • Juleigh Howard-Hobson • Final Cut Zine, October 31
“That is not what I meant at all” • Brian Hugenbruch • Abyss & Apex 76
“‘Flee’—The Last Dispatch from the Jemison Station” • Maya C. James • Star*Line 43.4
“Requiem” • Clay F. Johnson • Nightingale & Sparrow 8
“Form Factor” • Tim Jones • Eye To The Telescope 38
“Family Historian” • Herb Kauderer • Scifaikuest, August
“Cave Painting” • Oliver Keane •  Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
“Posle Nas” • Rosalie Morales Kearns • Apparition Lit 11
“Star Trip(tych)”  • M. X. Kelly • Speculative North 2
“Witching” • Erin Kirsh • Speculative North 2
“Life Goes On” • David C Kopaska-Merkel • Anwen 107
“We sell skin on sale” • Rachel Lachmansingh • Augur Magazine 3.2
“The Forest in the Full of the Moon” • Geoffrey A. Landis • New Myths, December
“Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Space & Time Magazine, May
“Last Seen Sunset” •  Hazel Ann Lee • Star*Line 43.4
“The Cat’s Epilogue” • Mary Soon Lee • The Sign of the Dragon (JABberwocky Literary Agency)
“Cavall” • Mary Soon Lee • Asimov’s Science Fiction, September/October
“What Phoenixes Read” • Mary Soon Lee • Star*Line 43.3
“Darning” • Sandra J. Lindow • Asimov’s Science Fiction, May/June
“Rapunzel at Seventy” • Sandra J. Lindow • Taj Mahal Review, June
“Grass Whisperer” • Lynne M MacLean • Speculative North 1
“Lovely Ludwig Van” • Alessandro Manzetti • Space & Time 139
“Kings and Queens of Narnia” • Meep Matsushima • Octavos 9/24/2020
“Black Water, Black Bones” • Michelle Muenzler • Liminality 23
“Libations” • Soonest Nathaniel • FIYAH 15
“Cento for Lagahoos” •  Brandon O’Brien • Uncanny 36
“Mountain” • Cindy O’Quinn • Shelved: Appalachian Resilience Amid Covid-19 (Mountain Gap Books anthology)
“You Were With Me” • CIndy O’Quinn • Space & Time Magazine 136
“The Krakeness” • K. A. Opperman • Cosmic Horror Monthly, June
“On the Edge of Forever” • Josh Pearce • Star*Line 43.1
“Fin” • Terese Mason Pierre • Uncanny 36
“Like Clockwork” • Christina M. Rau • Songs of Eretz Poetry Review, March
“Bar Scene” • John Reinhart • Star*Line 43.3
“It Feels Like Drowning” • Terrie Leigh Relf • HWA Poetry Showcase Vol. VII, ed. Stephanie Wytovich
“fear of police, but as sci-fi, because /that/ you can understand -or, less passive aggressively- get these fucking phasers out of my face” • J. C. Rodriguez • Freeze Ray Poetry 19
“invocation of my guardian angel in six sexts” • Camille Rosas • Eye to the Telescope 37
“Arrival Mind” • Louis B. Rosenberg • Arrival Mind (Outland Publishing)
“Of fairy tales—” • David F. Shultz • Star*Line 43.1
“People Dropping Dead in the Mall Parking Lot” • lan Ray Simmons • Abyss & Apex 76
“Journey’s End” • Marge Simon • Silver Blade 46
“Old Playfellow” • Noel Sloboda • Abyss & Apex 75
“Riding the Exhale” • Angela Yuriko Smith • HWA Poetry Showcase Vol. VII, ed. Stephanie Wytovich
“The Deer” • Christina Sng • A Collection of Dreamscapes (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
“Dream Weaver” • Blaize Kelly Strothers • Apparition Lit 12
“The Selkie Wife” • Marcie Lynn Tentchoff • Speculative North 3
“Andromeda’s Lament” • Gretchen Tessmer • Liminality 26
“End Credits” • Gretchen Tessmer • Liquid Imagination 44
“A Tempest” • Sheree Renée Thomas • Star*Line 43.4
“Why did white people conquer the world for spices and then never use them?” • R. Thursday • Drunk Monkeys, November 16
“King Pest” • Richard L. Tierney • Spectral Realms 13
“Athena Holds Up a Mirror to Strength” • Ali Trotta • Uncanny 34
“Persephone’s Sneakers” • Amanda Trout • Little Death Lit 5
“Extinction No. 6” • Morgan L. Ventura • Augur 3.2
“Unlooping” • Marie Vibbert • Asimov’s Science Fiction, January/February
“Acacia” • Holly Lyn Walrath • Liminality 24
“we are all energy” • M. Darusha Wehm • Kaleidotrope, Spring
“The Paper Effigies Shop” • Deborah Wong • Eye to the Telescope 36
[hand-me-down] • Greer Woodward • Eye to the Telescope 35
Long Poems (65 poems)
“And It Was Bad” • Anne Carly Abad • Abyss & Apex 75
“The Looking Glass” • Colleen Anderson • Illumen, Spring
“Snow White’s Apples” • Colleen Anderson • Polu Texni, April 14
“Time Traveller’s Memory” • Davian Aw • The Future Fire 55
“Regarding” • F. J. Bergmann • Polu Texni, March 30
“The Riches of Cloud Country” • Ruth Berman • Asimov’s Science Fiction, May/June
“Eleven exhibits in a better Natural History Museum, London” • Jenny Blackford • Strange Horizons, 14 September
“The priestess’s daughter” • Jenny Blackford • Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, February
“The Third Sister” • Andrea Blythe • Twelve (Interstellar Flight Press)
“Parabiont” • Robert Borski • Dreams and Nightmares 115
“It’s Like This I Told the Archangel” • Marianne Boruch • The Georgia Review, Fall(permission declined)
“Devilish Incarnations” • Bruce Boston • Star*Line 43.1
“Wishes” • Jennifer Bushroe • Polu Texni, September 7
“Learning the Way” • Sarah Cannavo • Liminality 25
“My Cat, He” • Beth Cato • Uncanny 36
“Cursebody” • May Chong • Apparition Lit 11
“Municipal Ghosts” • May Chong • Eye to the Telescope 36
La Bête: The Beast of Gévaudan” • Frank Coffman • Black Flames & Gleaming Shadows (Bold Venture Press)
“The Wheel of the Year” • Frank Coffman • Black Flames & Gleaming Shadows (Bold Venture Press)
“The Imp and the Bottle” • Sharon Cote • Star*Line 43.2
“The King of Eyes” • PS Cottier • Monstrous (IP, Brisbane, Australia)
“Twisted Sayings” • Ashley Dioses • The Withering (Jackanapes Press)
“After the Decipherment” • FJ Doucet • SFPA Poetry Contest
“Penelope, the truth” • Clarabelle Fields • Corvid Queen, April 3, 2020
“The Mad Scientist to the Muse of her Dreams” • Adele Gardner • Dreams and Nightmares 114
“Odysseus Grins at Fate and the Gods” • Adele Gardner • Mithila Review 13
“Seven Steps to Reach Your Father Across the Great Divide” • Adele Gardner • Liminality 25
“Cellars, Caskets, and Closets” • Maxwell I. Gold • Baffling Magazine 1
“The Secret Ingredient is Always the Same” • Sarah Grey • Fantasy Magazine 61
“Fermi’s Spaceship” • Jamal Hodge • Star*Line 43.4
“Igbo Landing” • Akua Lezli Hope • Penumbra, Fall 2020
“First Turn” • Juleigh Howard-Hobson • Final Cut Zine, October 31
“The Finger” • Abi Hynes • Dreams and Nightmares 114
“An Offering” • Michael Janairo • Line of Advance (2020 Col. Darron L. Wright Memorial Awards)
“The Emerald Witch Stone” • Clay F. Johnson • Moonchild Magazine, January
“The First Dragon” • Herb Kauderer • Altered Reality Magazine, 14 December
“The Unicorn Insane” • Herb Kauderer • Speculations II: Poetry from the Weird Poets’ Society, ed. Frank Coffman
“Dictionary of the Lost” • Luke Kernan • Déraciné 7
Robo sapiens Thinks He Thinks” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Eye To The Telescope 35
“Ford” • Mary Soon Lee • The Sign of the Dragon (JABberwocky Literary Agency)
“Jumble” • Mary Soon Lee • Heroic Fantasy Quarterly 43
“Two Weeks” • Mary Soon Lee • The Sign of the Dragon (JABberwocky Literary Agency)
“Invisible Ink” • Gerri Leen • Community of Magic Pens (Atthis Arts anthology)
“Social Graces” • Lori R. Lopez • Bewildering Stories 871
“The Whistle Stop” • Lori R. Lopez • Impspired 8
“The Son-in-Law from Hell” • LindaAnn LoSchiavo • Bewildering Stories 875
“Budapest: for Lianne” • S. Qiouyi Lu • In Charge Magazine, June 4
“Alice” • Alessandro Manzetti • Whitechapel Rhapsody (Independent Legions)
“the cage” • Alessandro Manzetti • Midnight Under the Big Top, ed. Brian James Freeman (Cemetery Dance Publications)
“The Believers” • Meep Matsushima • Strange Horizons, 21 December
“Nephele, On Friday” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Air: Sylphs, Spirits & Swan Maidens, ed. Rhonda Parrish (Tyche Books)
“There Must Be Blood” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Rejection Letters, October 8
“lagahoo culture (Part I)” Brandon O’Brien • Uncanny 35
“Mise-en-scène” • Suphil Lee Park • Michigan Quarterly—Mixtape: Apocalypse issue
“Next!” • Michael Payne •  Silver Blade 47
“Caged” • Marsheila Rockwell • American Diversity Report, December 16
“Our Lady of the Archerontia” • Allan Rozinski • Spectral Realms 13
“Such Monstrous Births” • Emily Smith • Strange Horizons, 9 March
“All that I have lost” • Christina Sng • A Collection of Dreamscapes (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
“Dark Forest” • Christina Sng • New Myths 53
“Hansel and Gretel” • Christina Sng • A Collection of Dreamscapes (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
“Love Song of the Swamp” • Alena Sullivan • Crow & Cross Keys, December
“A Song from Bedlam (with apologies to Christopher Smart)” • Nike Sulway • Liminality 23
“A Dish Best Served” • Lisa Timpf• Liminality 23
“Daughters Saving Mothers” • Holly Lyn Walrath • Liminality 23

Update 02/24/21: The poems by Marianne Boruch, Cynthia Cozette, Joshua Gage and Hazel Lee have been removed from the Rhysling candidates page after being withdrawn by the authors.

Pixel Scroll 1/2/21 You Put The Mime In The Tesseract And Drink Them Both Together

(1) DAVID WEBER STATUS. Word of this alarming news went out last night:

After the Turtledove tweet was reposted to David Weber’s author page on Facebook, his wife, Sharon Rice-Weber commented:

He’s doing better right now. I’ll try and keep everyone updated

Best wishes for a full recovery.

(2) NEW YEAR’S WHO. Camestros Felapton combines the features of a review and a complete script rewrite in his analysis of yesterday’s special: “Review: Doctor Who – Revolution of the Daleks”. BEWARE SPOILERS! BEWARE IMPROVEMENTS!

The New Year’s special provides a hit of Doctor Who but that is about all. The episode is inoffensive, it plays around with one interesting idea about the theatre of policing and the aesthetics of fascism but doesn’t know what to do with that. Above all, it exemplifies the frustrating aspects of the Chibnall era. There is always a feeling of a better episode, that is almost exactly the same, lurking around the same pieces….

On the other hand, this fellow found one part of the special to be exceptionally thrilling —

(3) IN BAD TIMES TO COME. Future Tense presents “The Vastation” by Paul Theroux, “a new short story about a future pandemic that makes COVID-19 look simple.”

Steering to his assigned slot in the out-going convoy behind a bulky bomb-proof escort truck, Father said, “We’re going to Greenville,” and looked for my reaction to this surprising announcement. Surprising, not just because Greenville was far away, and where my Mother had been living, but also because I had never been taken outside the perimeter of Chicago….

There is a response essay to the story by physician Allison Bond: “In a pandemic, what do doctors owe, and to whom?”

…Today—as in this story—we fight a deadly contagious disease that has hit some communities much harder than others, and through which xenophobia and racism have been allowed to fester. In Theroux’s story, people are segregated into camps by nationality, into “island[s] of ethnicity, renewed country-of-origin pride and defiance in the enormous sea of rural America.” Perhaps these stemmed from viewing people who are different from oneself as the enemy, and then working to avoid them—something that is already increasingly prevalent in our society, in part thanks to social media.

(4) TRAVEL SAFETY PROPOSAL. “What are COVID-19 digital immunity passports?”Slate explains.

This week, the first doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine were administered in the U.S.
With the FDA expected to approve Moderna’s vaccine imminently, people are already looking forward to a world where travel and gatherings are possible. But for those activities to be maximally safe, the country will either need to reach herd immunity—unlikely until mid-2021 at the earliest, assuming essentially flawless vaccine roll-out and widespread adoption—or to find ways to verify people’s negative tests or vaccination status in advance.

Some companies are looking to digital solutions. Airlines like JetBlue, United, and Virgin Atlantic have begun using CommonPass, an app developed by the Commons Project and the World Economic Forum that shows whether users have tested negative for COVID-19 for international travel. Ticketmaster, too, told Billboard that its “post-pandemic fan safety” plans include digital health passes that verify event-goers’ COVID-19 negative test results or vaccination status. While these digital health passes could become a prerequisite for some activities, widespread adoption of so-called immunity passports would require a level of coordination and organization uncharacteristic of the country’s response to COVID-19 so far….

(5) MEMORY WHOLE. The Guardian tries to answer its own question: “George Orwell is out of copyright. What happens now?” The situation resonates with Orwell’s pigs — some works are more out of copyright than others.

Much of the author’s work may have fallen into public ownership in the UK, but there are more restrictions on its use remaining than you might expect, explains his biographer.

George Orwell died at University College Hospital, London, on 21 January 1950 at the early age of 46. This means that unlike such long-lived contemporaries as Graham Greene (died 1991) or Anthony Powell (died 2000), the vast majority of his compendious output (21 volumes to date) is newly out of copyright as of 1 January. 

…As is so often the way of copyright cut-offs, none of this amounts to a free-for-all. Any US publisher other than Houghton Mifflin that itches to embark on an Orwell spree will have to wait until 2030, when Burmese Days, the first of Orwell’s books to be published in the US, breaks the 95-year barrier. And eager UK publishers will have to exercise a certain amount of care. The distinguished Orwell scholar Professor Peter Davison fathered new editions of the six novels back in the mid-1980s. No one can reproduce these as the copyright in them is currently held by Penguin Random House. Aspiring reissuers, including myself, have had to go back to the texts of the standard editions published in the late 1940s, or in the case of A Clergyman’s Daughter and Keep the Aspidistra Flying, both of which Orwell detested so much – he described the former as “bollox” – that he refused to have them reprinted in his lifetime, to the originals of, respectively, 1935 and 1936.

(6) STRANGER THAN FICTION. L. Jagi Lamplighter is interviewed by ManyBooks about her work with “A Magic School Like No Other”.

What inspired you to create the Roanoke Academy for the Sorcerous Arts?

The original game that the books are based upon took place at a popular magic school from another series. When I sat down to write this series, I had to invent a whole new magic school—and I had to make it something

My son, who was then about nine or ten, had come up with the idea that the colony on the Island of Roanoke had disappeared because the whole island vanished and that there was a school of magic upon it.

I loved this idea, but I didn’t really know much about the area of the country where Roanoke Island is. So I decided it was a floating island that could wander. Then I put it in the Hudson River, near Storm King Mountain, because that is a place I happen to love. I found out there was a small island in that spot that actually has a ruin of a castle on it. I made that island (Bannerman or Pollepel Island) the part of the island that was visible to the mundane world of the Unwary (us.)

I spent hours on the internet looking at photos of all sorts of places—forests, buildings—that I loved. Then I put those photos together to create the island and the school. So Roanoke Island has many things I think are beautiful, paper birch forests, boardwalks by a river, Oriental gardens.

Then I needed to design the school itself. I noted that there were series where the magic school is like a British boarding school and series where the school is like an American boarding school. I wanted something different. So I decided to model Roanoke Academy for the Sorcerous Arts after the college I attended. St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland is quite different from most other colleges. Students sit around one large table. They have core groups, other students who are in all your classes. They have tutors instead of professors. They have an unusual system of intramural sports—so strange that every time I put part of it in the book, my editor tags it as too extraordinary to be believable.

I took my experience at St. John’s and spun it into the world of the Hudson Highlands, creating a marvelous place that is delightful to write about and, God willing, a joy for the reader, too.

(7) PULLING CABLE. FirstShowing.net introduces the trailer for “Intriguing Gig Economy Quantum Sci-Fi Film ‘Lapsis’”.

… Struggling to support himself and his ailing younger brother, delivery man Ray takes a strange job as a “cabler” in a strange new realm of the gig economy. This film is set in an alternate reality where the quantum computing revolution has begun, but they need to hire people to connect the cables for miles between huge magnetic cubes. 

(8) BOLLING OBIT. Pianist, composer, and bandleader Claude Bolling died December 29. The Guardian’s tribute notes —

…He wrote music for over one hundred films …  such as The Hands of Orlac (1960), … The Passengers (1977) [released in the US as The Intruder, based on Dean Koontz’s 1973 novel Shattered], The Awakening, a 1980 British horror film [third film version of Bram Stoker’s 1903 novel The Jewel of Seven Stars]. Bolling also composed the music for the Lucky Luke animated features Daisy Town (1971) and La Ballade des Dalton (1978).

(9) DOMINGUEZ OBIT. “Disney Legend” Ron Dominguez died January 1 at 85.

In 1957, Dominguez became the assistant supervisor of Frontierland, moving up to the manager of Tomorrowland in 1962. He became the manager of the west side of Disneyland and in 1974, was named vice president of Disneyland and chairman of the park operating committee.

In 1990, Dominguez became Executive Vice President Walt Disney Attractions, West Coast.

(10) VOYAGER DOCUMENTARY ASKS FOR FUNDS. Comicbook.com gives fans a head’s up: “Star Trek: Voyager Documentary Announces Crowdfunding Campaign”.

The upcoming Star Trek: Voyager documentary is ready to begin crowdfunding. The new documentary would have commemorated Voyager‘s 25th anniversary in 2020, but the coronavirus dashed most of those celebration plans. David Zappone of 455 Studios, the production company behind previous Star Trek documentaries like For the Love of SpockChaos on the Bridge, and What We Left Behind, confirmed that filming for the documentary resumed in August. Now it seems the production has reached the point where it’s ready to raise funds from fans. As Voyager star Garrett Wang (Ensign Harry Kim) explains in the announcement video below, fans will be able to donate to the campaign and pre-order the documentary beginning on March 1st.

Click to see the “Special Announcement From Garrett Wang”.

(11) TODAY’S DAY.

(12) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

  • January 2, 1978 Blake’s 7 premiered on BBC. It was created by Terry Nation of Doctor Who fame, who also wrote the first series, and produced by David Maloney (series 1–3) and Vere Lorrimer (series 4), with  the script editor throughout its run being Chris Boucher. Terry has said Star Trek was one of his main inspirations. It would would run for a total of fifty-two episodes. Principal cast was Gareth Thomas, Michael Keating, Sally Knyvette, Paul Darrow and David Jackson. Critics at the times were decidedly mixed with their reaction which is not true of audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes who give an amazing ninety one percent rating! 

(13) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and John Hertz.]

  • Born January 2, 1814 – Luise Mühlbach.  A score of historical-fiction novels; you can read Old Fritz and the New Era here (Fritz is a nickname for Friedrich; she means Frederick II of Prussia); it has fantastic elements.  She says “To investigate and explain … is the task of historical romance….  poesy… illuminated by historic truth….  Show me from history that it could not be so; that it is not in accordance with the character of the persons represented … then have I … presented only a caricature, faulty as a work of art.”  (Died 1873) [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1871 – Nora Hopper.  Journalist and poet in the 1890s Irish literary movement; Yeats said her Ballads in Prose “haunted me as few books have ever haunted me, for it spoke in strange wayward stories and birdlike little verses of things and persons I remember or had dreamed of.”  There’s a 2017 Trieste reprint.  (Died 1906) [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1920 Isaac Asimov. I can’t possibly summarize him here so I won’t. My favorite novels by him are the original Foundation novels followed very closely by his Galactic Empire series and I, Robot. I know I’ve read a lot of his short fiction but I’ll be damn if I can recall any of it specifically right now. And I can’t possibly list all his Hugos here. (Died 1992.)  (CE) 
  • Born January 2, 1932 – Minagawa Hiroko, age 92.  (Personal name last, Japanese style.)  Three of her stories are in English, two in Speculative Japan 3-4.  Shibata Prize.  More famous for detective fiction; Honkaku Award for The Resurrection Fireplace (in Japanese Hirakasete itadaki kôei desu, roughly “I am honored to open it”), set in 18th Century London; Mystery Writers of Japan Award, Japan Mystery Literature Award for lifetime achievement.  [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1948 Deborah Watling. Best known for her role as Victoria Waterfield, a companion of the Second Doctor. She was also in Downtime, playing the same character, a one-off sequel to a sequel to the Second Doctor stories, The Abominable Snowmen and The Web of Fear. No Doctors were to be seen. If you’ve seen the English language dubbed version of Viaje al centro de la Tierra (Where Time Began, based off Verne’s Journey to the Center of The Earth), she’s doing the lines of Ivonne Sentis as Glauben. (Died 2017.) (CE) 
  • Born January 2, 1954 – Ertugrul Edirne, age 67.  Twoscore covers in German SF.  Here is Galactic Trade.  Here is On the Great River.  Here is Kushiel’s Dart (German title In den Händen der Feinde, “In the Hands of the Enemy”).  Here is Not From This World.  [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1959 – Patrick Nielsen Hayden, age 62.  Long-time fan, also guitarist (lead guitar in Whisperado).  TAFF (Trans-Atlantic Fan Fund) delegate with wife Teresa Nielsen Hayden, both wrote “TAFF in Thirteen Paragraphs”, fanzines e.g. IzzardTelos, Fan Guests of Honor at MidAmeriCon II the 74th Worldcon where at Closing Ceremonies PNH said “I can’t count the conversations I’ve had with total strangers”, see my con report (at the end, with a poem for each).  Meanwhile also active as a pro; now VP, Assoc. Publisher, and Editor-in-Chief at Tor.  [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1967 Tia Carrere, 54. Best remembered for her three season run as Sydney Fox, rogue archaeologist on Relic Hunter. She’s been in a number of one-offs on genre series including Quantum LeapHerculesTales from The Crypt, AirwolfFriday the 13th and played Agent Katie Logan for two episodes on Warehouse 13. (CE) 
  • Born January 2, 1971 Renée Elise Goldsberry, 50. Best known for appearing on Altered Carbon as Quellcrist Falconer. She also performed the Johnny Cash song “Ain’t No Grave” for the end credits in the final episode of that series. Genre wise, she’s had one-offs on EnterpriseLife on MarsEvil and voice work on DreamWorks Dragons: Rescue Riders, an all too cute series.  She was Selena Izard in The House with a Clock in Its Walls. And she appeared on Broadway in The Lion King as Nala.   (CE) 
  • Born January 2, 1979 Tobias S. Buckell, 42. I read and enjoyed a lot his Xenowealth series which he managed to wrap up rather nicely. The collection he edited, The Stories We Tell: Bermuda Anthology of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror, is well worth reading, as is his own Tides from a New World collection. And his Tangled Lands collection which won the World Fantasy Award is amazing reading as well. (CE) 
  • Born January 2, 1982 – Aníbal J. Rosario Planas, age 39.  (In this Hispanic style two surnames are given, the father’s Rosario then the mother’s Planas.)  Drummer and author.  Here are a photo, a 150-word teaser from his story Pólvora y vapor (“powder and steam”; in Spanish), and links to his talk (in Spanish and English) about Steampunk Writers Around the World.  [JH]
  • Born January 2, 1983 Kate Bosworth, 38. She’s Barbara Barga in the SS-GB series done off the superb Len Deighton novel  which is definitely genre. She’s both a producer and a performer on The I-Land series where she’s KC, a decidedly not nice person. For a much more positive character, she portrayed Lois Lane in Superman Returns. (CE) 

(14) COMICS SECTION.

(15) GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN. In the Washington Post, Michael Cavna notes that Calvin and Hobbes’s last strip was on December 31, 1995, which gives him a chance to praise Bill Watterson and explain why his strip is timeless comedy.  In a sidebar, Cavna notes two other important comic strips ended in 1995:  Gary Larson’s “The Far Side” and Berkeley Breathed’s “Bloom County” spinoff “Outland.”  But he notes that Bill Watterson praised Richard Thompson’s “Cul de Sac” as showing that “the launch of great comics was still possible” and interviews Breathed, who revived “Bloom County” as an online venture in 2015. “’Calvin and Hobbes’ said goodbye 25 years ago. Here’s why Bill Watterson’s masterwork enchants us still.”

…Stephan Pastis, creator of “Pearls Before Swine,” views Calvin as an expression of pure childlike id, yet thinks there is a whole other dynamic that makes many of Calvin’s acts of imagination so appealing.

Watterson “accurately captured how put-upon you feel as a kid — how limited you are by your parents, by your babysitter, by [schoolteacher] Miss Wormwood. You’re really boxed in and all you have is individual expression,” says Pastis, who collaborated with the “Calvin and Hobbes” creator on a week of “Pearls” strips in 2014, marking Watterson’s only public return to the comics page since 1995.

“I think that’s why to this day, some people get [Calvin] tattooed on their bodies,” Pastis continues. “He stands for that rebellious spirit in the fact of a world that kind of holds you down. You get into adulthood, you get held down by your various responsibilities. Calvin rebels against that, therefore he always remains a hero.”

(16) FOR POETS. The Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) is taking nominations from members for two 2021 awards.

  • Rhysling Award Nominations: The 2021 Rhysling Chair is Alessandro Manzetti. Nominations are open until February 15 for the Rhysling Awards for the best poems published in 2020. Only SFPA members may nominate one short poem and/or one long poem for the award. Poets may not nominate their own work. All genres of speculative poetry are eligible. Short poems must be under 50 lines (no more than 500 words for prose poems); Long poems are 50+ lines, not including title or stanza breaks, and first published in 2020; include publication and issue, or press if from a book or anthology. Online nomination form here. Or nominate by mail to SFPA secretary: Brian Garrison, SFPA, PO Box 1563, Alameda CA 94501, USA.
  • Elgin Award Nominations: The 2021 Elgin Chair is Jordan Hirsch. Nominations due by May 15; more info will come by MailChimp. Send title, author, and publisher of speculative Star*Line 8 Winter 2021 poetry books and chapbooks published in 2019 or 2020 to elgin@sfpoetry.com or by mail to the SFPA secretary: Brian Garrison, SFPA, PO Box 1563, Alameda CA 94501, USA. Only SFPA members may nominate; there is no limit to nominations, but you may not nominate your own work.

(17) OFF THE MARKET. Such is the draw of iconic movie locations. The LA Times explains the attraction of “Jim Brandon’s South Pasadena home”.

Jim Brandon better get used to unexpected visitors. The writer-producer, whose credits include “Arrested Development” and “Mixed-ish,” just paid about $2.2 million for a South Pasadena home with a special place in “Back to the Future” lore.

The 1985 hit doubles as a tour of L.A. County in many ways, with landmarks such as Griffith Park and the Gamble House popping up throughout the film. Another pivotal scene is set in Brandon’s new yard, where Marty McFly stumbles upon his father being a peeping Tom in the tree out front.

According to the home’s previous owner, filmmaker John McDonald, fans of the movie regularly make the trek to South Pasadena to pay homage — and climb up the now-famous tree to re-create the scene….

(18) MEMORY LANE.

In 1953, the International Fantasy Award was given to Clifford M. Simak for City, his first Award. This collection is sometimes presented as a novel which it is decidedly not as it is a fix-up of the stories “City”, “Huddling Place”, “Census”, “Paradise”, “Hobbies”, “Aesop” and “Trouble with Ants …”. The other nominations were Takeoff by C. M. Kornbluth and Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.  A  Retro Hugo Award at CoNZealand in 2020 would be awarded to it as well. 

(19) NOTHING HAPPENING HERE, MOVE ALONG. In December someone pointed out that John C. Wright’s website was displaying an “Account Suspended” sign. My social media searches found no protests or grievances about this – or even that anyone else was aware of it. Wright subsequently explained the cause in “Account Not Suspended”.

My loyal webgoblin called the hosting company and reports that they said that the server was migrated this morning and that various changes are still propagating through their system. The “account suspended” message was a default one. The hosting company confirmed that there’s nothing wrong with the account and that the site hasn’t been pulled offline due to excessive bandwidth or any sort of legal action

(20) EXPANDING UNIVERSE. More Star Wars properties are on the way.

Star Wars: The Bad Batch is an all-new animated series from Lucasfilm Animation coming soon to Disney+.

In another new Disney+ series, Star Wars: Andor, Diego Luna will reprise his role as Cassian Andor.

(21) FUTURE FORSEEN. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] “What Will Future Homes Look Like?  Filmed In the 1960s” on YouTube is an episode of the CBS News show 21st Century (which ran between 1967-70) called “At Home, 2001” narrated by Walter Cronkite, which tried to predict from the viewpoint of 1967 what homes in the 21st century would look like.  Among the predictions:  3-D televisions twice as large as the largest current flat screen, plastic plates that would be molded for each use and then put into a vat to be printed again for the next use, and dinners that were programmed and cooked via computer.  The show also saw that computers at home could teach kids and enable people to work at home, and there’s a prediction of something like cable TV.  What they got wrong:  there is no internet or YouTube.

[Thanks to Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, John King Tarpinian, Cat Eldridge, JJ, Michael Toman, John Hertz, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Sam. And that came from Sam’s first-ever comment here!]

2020 Rhysling Awards

Jessica J. Horowitz and Rebecca Buchanan are the winners of the 2020 Rhysling Awards presented by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA).

The winners were chosen by SFPA members, with 112 votes cast.

The 2020 Rhysling Awards

Short Poem Category

First Place

Second Place

Third Place (tie)

  • “Creation: Dark Matter Dating App” • Sandra J. Lindow • Asimov’s SF, July/August
  • “The Day the Animals Turned to Sand” • Tyler Hagemann • Amazing Stories, Spring

Long Poem Category

First Place

  • Heliobacterium daphnephilum” • Rebecca Buchanan • Star*Line 42.3

Second Place

Third Place (tie)

  • “The Macabre Modern” • Kyla Lee Ward • The Macabre Modern and Other Morbidities (P’rea Press, 2019)
  • “Ode to the Artistic Temperament” • Michael H. Payne • Silver Blade 42

[Via Locus Online.]

2020 Rhysling Award Nominees

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has finalized its 2020 Rhysling Award candidates, reports David C. Kopaska-Merkel. Eighty-four members nominated.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words.

SFPA members have until June 15 to vote on the winners.

Short Poems (77 poems)
“Abeona, Goddess of Outward Journeys, Pilots the Interstellar Ark” • Nisa Malli • Apparition Lit 7
“Aliens declutter” • PS Cottier • Scifaikuest, August
“All-Father” • Vince Gotera • Dreams and Nightmares 111
“Alternate Galatea” • Amelia Gorman • Liminality 21
“Area 51 Custodian Gets Coffee” • Juleigh Howard-Hobson • Star*Line 42.4
“Blood Moon” • Sara Backer • Polu Texni, November 24
“The Book of Fly” • John Philip Johnson • Rattle 63
“The Certainty of Seeing” • Michelle Muenzler • Polu Texni, 3 June
“Collie Dogs In Space” • Debby Feo • A Poet Explores The Stars, ed. J. Alan Erwine (Nomadic Delirium Press)
“Continuum” • G. O. Clark • Analog, September/October
“Creation: Dark Matter Dating App” • Sandra J. Lindow • Asimov’s SF, July/August
“Crimson Faces” • Maxwell I. Gold • Space & Time Magazine 135
“The Day the Animals Turned to Sand” • Tyler Hagemann • Amazing Stories, Spring
“Disassembly at Auction” • Robin Wyatt Dunn • Mobius: The Journal of Social Change 30:4
“Don’t Open the Box!” • Kyla Lee Ward • The Macabre Modern and Other Morbidities (P’rea Press)
“drag strip drag” • Francine P. Lewis • Eye to the Telescope 32
“Eldritch Horror” • Katie Manning • Bowery Gothic I
“Encore” • Tim Jones • Big Hair Was Everywhere (ESAW)
“Fallen But Not Down” • Sarah Cannavo • Liminality 20
“Fallen Star” • Clay F. Johnson • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
From “Moon Sonnet” • Lily Zhou • Poetry, May
“The Ghosts of Those” • Ron Riekki • Star*Line 42.2
“The Girl who Loved Birds” • Clara Blackwood • Amazing Stories 3
“Goddamn These Minotaurs” • Persephone Erin Hudson • paintbucket, November 10
“haiku” • Juan M. Perez • haikuniverse, June 8
“Halsted IV” • Jeff Crandall • Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October
“How to Care for Your Yesterday’s Camel” • Christina Olson • The Last Mastodon (Rattle Foundation)
“How to Colonize Ganymede” • Mary Soon Lee • New Myths 48
“How To Dance With Dark Matter” • Mary Soon Lee • Uppagus 37
“Huitzilopochtli” • Lorraine Schein • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
“If All the Seas Were Blood” • D. L. Myers • Oracles from the Black Pool (Hippocampus Press)
“The Journey” • Deborah L. Davitt • Polu Texni, April 1
“Lady Macbeth’s Green Gown” • Jacqueline West • Liminality 19
“Mary Agnes Chase (1869–1963)” • Jessy Randall • Strange Horizons, December 9
“Mary Poppins, 2100” • Cathy Tenzo • Typehouse 18
“The Mother Searches for Her Own Story” • Mary McMyne • Strange Horizons, November 11
“Mothsong” • John Philip Johnson • Liquid Imagination 42
“My Ghost Will Know The Way” • Beth Cato • The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July/August
“New Stars” • F. J. Bergmann • Maria W. Faust Sonnet Contest
“The Night the Unicorn Leapt from the Tapestry” • Kate Pentecost • Liminality 19
“No Fairy Tale World” • Lisa Timpf • New Myths 47
“The Nonpareils: As Told by the Woman in the Gingerbread House” • Kathleen A. Lawrence • Star*Line 42.4
“Objects of Desire” • Gerri Leen • Dreams and Nightmares 113
“Óòjí Íjè [Kola Journey]” • Uche Ogbuji • FIYAH Literary Magazine 11
“The Planets? Sweet …” • Harris Coverley • Star*Line 42.4
“Phobos and Deimos” • W. C. Roberts • Chrome Bairn 82
“Prayer on a Friday Morning” • L. R. Harvey • American Diversity Report, December
“A Purring Cat is a Time Machine” • Beth Cato • Daikaijuzine 1
“Regarding me” • Michael H. Hanson • HWA Poetry Showcase VI
“Reparation” • Christina Sng • Spectral Realms 11
“Revisiting the origins of language” • Terrie Leigh Relf • Space & Time Magazine 133
“Robert Goddard at Roswell” • Alan Ira Gordon • Star*Line 42.4
“The Root King’s Winter” • Jessica P. Wick • Enchanted Living/Faerie Magazine, Winter
“A Rose Waits” • Adele Gardner • Dreams and Nightmares 113
“The Ruined Library” • Bruce Boston • Asimov’s SF, May/June
“The Sacrifices” • Mike Allen • Sycorax 2
“Samsara” • Jason O’Toole • The Scrib Arts Journal, Fall
“Seven Reasons to Have Hope for a Better Future. Number Five Will Really Get You!” • Catherine Kyle • Quail Bell, February
“shoals of Miami” • Greer Woodward • Troutswirl, December 4
“Singing Ghost” • Catherine Kyle • Quail Bell, February
“The Snow Globe” • Marge Simon • Polu Texni, 8 December
“The Solace of the Farther Moon” • Allan Rozinski • Weirdbook Annual 2
“Sphere” • Francis W. Alexander • Scifaikuest XVI:1
“Steampunk Christmas” • David Clink • Star*Line 42.4
“Styx” • Christina Sng • Spectral Realms 11
“Taking, Keeping” • Jessica J. Horowitz • Apparition Lit 5
“Ten-Card Tarot, Pentacles Wild” • F. J. Bergmann • Eye to the Telescope 32
“Three of Swords, King of Cups” • Ali Trotta • Fireside Fiction, July
“To Skeptics” • Mary Soon Lee • Fantasy & Science Fiction, July/August
“The Unseen” • Fran Wilde • Fireside Fiction, March
“Wake Up, Little Stevie” • Christina Olson • The Last Mastodon (Rattle Foundation)
“What You Hear When Your Best Friend Falls for a Supervillain” • Beth Cato • Star*Line 42.1
“when my father reprograms my mother {” • Caroline Mao • Strange Horizons, Fund Drive
“Where Have the Space Heroes Gone?” • Darrell Schweitzer •  Amazing Stories 77:1
“The Wishing Clock of Gassytown” • Deborah Wong • Frozen Wavelets 1
“Witch” • Mary Soon Lee • Polu Texni, October 21
“The Wolfman and Space Girl” • Neil Sloboda • Neon 48
Long Poems (49 poems)
“Afterlife” • F. J. Bergmann • Shoreline of Infinity 14
“Borrower” • Cislyn Smith • Strange Horizons, July 29
“Bright Record” • John W. Sexton • Polu Texni, April 8
“Cannibal Rex” • Allan Rozinski • Anatomy of Hate, ed. Karen Otto (Alban Lake Publishing)
“Childhood Memory from the Old Victorian House on Warner” • Beth Cato • Uncanny 27
“Children of the Trees” • Deborah L. Davitt • Polu Texni, March 11
“The Cinder Girl Burns Brightly” • Theodora Goss • Uncanny 28
“The City That Changed Hands” • Maya Chhabra • Strange Horizons, December 23
“Consumption” • Emma J. Gibbon • Eye to the Telescope 33
“Crop Circles” • Lori R. Lopez • Deep Fried Horror, Mother’s Day Edition
“The Daily Freak Show” • Bruce Boston • New Myths 47
“Driven” • Marcie Tentchoff • Outposts of Beyond VII:1
“Eight Simulations for the Missing” • T. D. Walker • Small Waiting Objects (CW Books)
“Envoy” • F. J. Bergmann • Polu Texni, October 28
“For My Daughter Who Will Ask for a Seismograph Implant” • T. D. Walker • Small Waiting Objects (CW Books)
“Fune-RL” • Emma J. Gibbon • Strange Horizons, 15 July
“Green Sky” • Herb Kauderer • Influence of the Moon, ed. Shannon Yseult (518 Publishing)
Heliobacterium daphnephilum” • Rebecca Buchanan • Star*Line 42.3
“If Love is Real, So Are Fairies” • Cynthia So • Uncanny 29
“In The End, Only The Gods” • Christina Sng • Tales Of The Lost Vol. 1, eds. Eugene Johnson & Steve Dillon (Things in the Well)
“Inside My Belly” • Alessandro Manzetti • The Place of Broken Things (Crystal Lake Publishing)
“Keep My Course True” • Gerri Leen • Dreams and Nightmares 112
“Lines Written by Moonlight at Whitby Abbey” • Clay F. Johnson • Influence of the Moon, ed. Shannon Yseult (518 Publishing)
“The Macabre Modern” • Kyla Lee Ward • The Macabre Modern and Other Morbidities (P’rea Press)
“Maculation” • F. J. Bergmann • Spectral Realms 10
“The making of dragons” • Herb Kauderer • Altered Reality Magazine, January 30
“The Mining Town” • Holly Lyn Walrath • 2019 SFPA Poetry Contest
“My Stories Are Hungry” • John C. Mannone • American Diversity Report, April 10
“Nan-e” • Leon Mackenzie • Neon 49
“Nocturnal Embers” • Lori R. Lopez • The Sirens Call 43
“Obsidian” • Fungisayi Sasa • New Myths 46
“Ode to the Artistic Temperament” • Michael H. Payne • Silver Blade 42
“Reincarnation” • John C. Mannone • Abyss & Apex 69
“A Ride through Faerie” • Clay F. Johnson • Enchanted Conversation, September
“The Scarecrow’s Lover” • Alexandria Baisden • Abyss & Apex 72
“The Scroll of Thoth” • Frank Coffman • The Coven’s Hornbook and Other Poems (Bold Venture Press)
“Scylla and Charybdis” • Wade German • Weird Fiction Review 9
“Sea Witch From the Deep” • Ellen Huang • Apparition Lit 7
“The Storm Witch” • Colleen Anderson • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
“Stormbound” • Marsheila Rockwell • Polu Texni, February 11
Sycophantam astrum” • Rebecca Buchanan • Eye to the Telescope 34
“Tarot Times” • Bruce Boston • Illumen, summer
“tetrahedral edifices of a sticky rice realm” • D. A. Xiaolin Spires • Mithila Review, November 20
“Treason” • Shana Ross • Liminality 20
“the undrowned” • Catherine Kyle • Crab Fat Magazine, January
“why not?” • Gerri Leen • New Myths 49
“witches we” • Adele Gardner • Bluff & Vine 3
“The Wolf Isn’t The Only One Who Hides in Human Clothes” • Natalie Wang • Corvid Queen, January 5
“The Woman Who Talks to Her Dog at the Beach” • Geoff Inverarity • Geist 113

[Thanks to F. J. Bergmann for the story.]

2019 Rhysling Award Nominees

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has finalized its 2018 Rhysling Award candidates, reports David C. Kopaska-Merkel. Eighty-nine members voted.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words.

SFPA members have until June 15 to vote on the winners.

Short Poems (86 poems)
3D-Printed Brother • Millie Ho • Strange Horizons 9/25/18
Acceptable Documentation • Sonya Taaffe • Sycorax Journal 1
After Her Brother Ripped the Heads from Her Paper Dolls • Beth Cato • Mythic Delirium 4.3
Alien Interview Questions • Mary Soon Lee • Dreams and Nightmares 109
An Alien Visits an Earth Psychiatrist • John Grey • The Pedestal Magazine 82
“as if …” • LeRoy Gorman • Atlas Poetica: 25 Science Fiction Tanka & Kyoka, eds. Julie Bloss Kelsey & Susan Burch
beseeching the kitchen gods • M. C. Childs • Grievous Angel 5/20/18
Cardiad • Virginia M. Mohlere • Mythic Delirium 4.4
A City Built on Bones • Ann K. Schwader • Abyss & Apex, March
Colorless Reflexion • Cindy O’Quinn • Poppy Road Review 8/29/18
Concerning President Carter and the UFO Sighting • August Huerta • Strange Horizons 3/19/18
Consumption •  Jennifer Ruth Jackson • Eye to the Telescope 29
The Crimson Witch • K. A. Opperman • Eye to the Telescope 30
Curse of Waccasassa Lagoon • John Reinhart • Dreams and Nightmares 109
Data Value • Patricia Gomes • Star*Line 41.2
Dead-Eye Girl • Holly Lyn Walrath • Liminality 17
Dear Creator • Mary Soon Lee • Fantasy & Science Fiction, January/February
The Dissolution of Icarus • Michelle Muenzler • Liminality 18
Divinatory • Rose Lemberg • Sycorax Journal 1
Down in Windy Hollow • Jenny Blackford • The School Magazine, June
Dream Catchers • Steve DeFrance • The Poet’s Haven poetry gallery
drop some amens • Brandon O’Brien • Uncanny 21
Echoes of Light from Orbit • Megan Engelhardt • Asimov’s SF, November/December
Engineered •  Bruce McAllister • Analog Science Fiction and Fact, March/April
Entanglement • David C. Kopaska-Merkel & Kendall Evans • Entanglement (diminuendo press)
Esprit d’Escalier • May Chong • Apparition Lit 1
Excalibur’s Lament • P.S. Cottier • Eye to the Telescope 27
Flat Dyson • Francis W. Alexander • Spaceports & Spidersilk, July
Forest Mother • Christina Sng • The Ladies of Horror Picture-Prompt Writing Challenge
Fortune Favors the Cold • Katherine Inskip • Abyss & Apex 68
From Her Tower, the Lady of Shalott Sees the Ice Age Come • R. Mac Jones • Eye to the Telescope 27
Galahad Returns from the Holy Wars • David E. Cowen • Bleeding Saffron (Weasel Press)
Generation Ship • David Barber • Kaleidotrope, Summer
The Girl and Her Wolf Dog • Christina Sng • Spectral Realms 8
Golgothan (Shit Demon’s Sonnet) • David F Shultz • Deadman’s Tome Shit Fest, ed. Jesse Dedman (?)
Heart’s Desire • Lynn White • The Sirens Call 41
Hey Man, Nice Shot • Gretchen Tessmer • Strange Horizons 2/26/18
Intruders • Cindy O’Quinn • Star*Line 41.2
The Ladies of Lancashire • Clay F. Johnson • Eye to the Telescope 30
Laika • Holly Day • Dreams and Nightmares 109
Lament of the Four Moons • Kendall Evans & John Philip Johnson • Asimov’s SF, ?
Lost Memories • Bruce Boston • The Literary Hatchet 19
The Maenad to Her Artist Friend • Amal El-Mohtar • Strange Horizons 2/12/18
Mars Must Remember • Denise Dumars • The Pedestal Magazine 82
Mining Time • P.S. Cottier • Not Very Quiet 2
Monster, Creature, Human • Herb Kauderer • Dreams and Nightmares 109
My Little Vampire • Adele Gardner • Dreams and Nightmares 110
The Mysterious Hermit • Krystal Volney • krystalvolneyfanssite
Neuroweb • Logan Thrasher Collins • Abyss & Apex 67
The Nightmare Thing • Sandra Kasturi • Eye to the Telescope 29
O Siren • Ashley Dioses • Liquid Imagination 38
Ode to the Gorgon • K. A. Opperman • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
Okuri Inu, or the sending-off dog demon • Betsy Aoki • Uncanny 22
Our Lady of the Winter Squash • Jenny Blackford • Polu Texni 10/29/18
Pan’s Descent • Bruce Boston • Artifacts (Independent Legions Publishing)
Past Is Present • Deborah L. Davitt • Modern Poetry Review 8
The Patron Saint of Alien Abductees • Noel Sloboda • Evansville Review XXVIII
Pinocchio Plays the Cotton Club • Alan Ira Gordon • Star*Line 41.3
Planck Length • David F. Shultz • Dreams and Nightmares 108
Planetary Lensing • Herb Kauderer • Dreams & Nightmares 109
Planktivorous Fish and the Structure of Pelagic Plankton • David Clink • Juniper 2:2
Pouring the Pennyroyal • Andrea Blythe & Laura Madeline Wiseman • Priestess & Hierophant 5
Quetzalcoatlus roboti Heads Home • Vince Gotera • Multiverse, ed. Russell Jones (Shoreline of Infinity)
Relic • Kari Flickinger • Riddled with Arrows 2.3
The Sea Horse Isles • Michael H. Hanson • Untimely Frost: Poetry Unthawed, eds. Suzie & Bruce Lockhart (Lycan Valley Press)
The Sea Never Says It Loves You • Fran Wilde • Uncanny 21
Seraphima • Hal Y. Zhang • Liminality 15
Son of Aswang • Vince Gotera • The Philippines Graphic, October
The Southern Lady • Marge Simon • War (Crystal Lake Publishing)
Spatial Arrangement • David F. Shultz • Abyss & Apex 65
“Stand and Wait” • Herb Kauderer • Scifaikuest print, August
Station Rain • Erik Burdett • Apparition Lit 4
Stephen Hawking • Greer Woodward • Haikuniverse 3/24/18
That’s one small step for (a) man … • Russell Jones • Dark Matters (Tapsalteerie Press)
Things That Go Bump and Smile in the Night • Kathleen A. Lawrence • Altered Reality Magazine ?
This Sacred Earth • Deborah L. Davitt • Abyss & Apex 67
Thunderstorm in Glasgow, July 25 2013 • Amal El-Mohtar • Fireside Fiction broadside
Trips to Impossible Cities • Sandra Kasturi • Amazing Stories Magazine 2
Try the Veal • Robert Beveridge • Vastarien 1
Universal Immigrants • Ann K. Schwader • Star*Line 41.1
Unstole It • Jim Davies • Altered Reality Magazine ?
Venusian Arachnoids • David F. Shultz • Star*Line 41.1
Waterworld • Terry Persun • Space & Time Magazine 131
What Is Dead • Kristin Garth • Luna Luna Magazine 4/13/18
What Loves You • Jeff Crandall • Fantasy & Science Fiction September/October
Wraiths • Wade German • Vastarien 1:1
Long Poems (54 poems)
3-Minute Future • F. J. Bergmann • Unlikely Stories V
After the Wolf • Jeff Crandall • Fantasy & Science Fiction March/April
Alima among the Trees • T. D. Walker • Projector Magazine 1
Atomic Numbers • D. A. Xaolin Spires • Analog Science Fiction and Fact, January/February
Cassini’s Mini-Packets Home • Jessy Randall • Strange Horizons 7/2/18
Cataclysm Days: Arizona Conservatives Revert to Old Forms of Worship • Chuck Von Nordheim • Liquid Imagination 37
The Cat’s Daughters • Nitoo Das • Uncanny 20
Cinderella’s Pumpkin • Colleen Anderson • Polu Texni 5/28/18
The Collaborator • Cassandra Rose Clarke • Illumen, Spring
Commemoration of the Divine Passion • William Cook • Eye to the Telescope 30
Conditions of the Curse • Herb Kauderer • Exploits in the Adirondacks, eds. (pub518)
Dragon Mountain • Mary Soon Lee • Heroic Fantasy Quarterly 35
Drug Wars • Marge Simon • War (Crystal Lake Publishing)
The Fairies in the Crawlspace • Beth Cato • Uncanny 21
Finding Hecate • Clay F. Johnson • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
five sigils • David F. Shultz • Eye to the Telescope 27
Getting to Mars • Roger Dutcher • The Pedestal Magazine 82
If you would seek a Seeress • Rebecca Buchanan • Star*Line 41.1
In the Vaults • Adele Gardner • The Pedestal Magazine 82
It Took Some Time • David C. Kopaska-Merkel • Devilfish Review 20
The Kind Thing to Do • Kurt Newton • Polu Texni 4/23/18
The Last Transport • Frank Coffman • Abyss & Apex 65
Lorelei • Ali Trotta • Uncanny 22
Lost Girls • Rachel Verkade • Liminality 15
Misstep • David C. Kopaska-Merkel • Star*Line 41.4
Mother • Deborah L. Davitt • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
Mother Giant • Peri Fae Blomquist • Mythic Delirium 4.4
nakajiru • D. A. Xiaolin Spires • Mithila Review 10
The Nightmares • Wade German • Spectral Realms ?
Nixon’s Planet • Peter Ullian • Secret Histories and Exobiologies (Poet’s Haven)
Om Economics • Sandra J. Lindow • 2018 SFPA Poetry Contest
Our Minds Are Jewels of Uncertainty • Terrie Leigh Relf & Kendall Evans • Star*Line 41.3
Past Far Gone • Toby Macnutt • Arsenika 3
The Poisoning •  Jessica Drake-Thom • Eye to the Telescope 29
The Prophet’s Vision • W. C. Roberts • Polu Texni 10/15/18
The Protest: Ant Work Ethic • Michael H. Payne • Civilized Beasts III, ed. Vincent Corbeau (Weasel Press)
Ragnarök: A Prism • Alexandra Seidel • Sycorax Journal 1
Rapunzel • Christina Sng • Dreams and Nightmares 109
Rex Arthurs • Deborah L. Davitt • Eye to the Telescope 27
The Sea-Wolf of Brittany • Deborah L. Davitt • Liminality 17
The Search • Deborah L. Davitt • Zetetic, May
Seven Witches • Alexandra Seidel • Eye to the Telescope 30
Skathi’s Spite • Deborah L. Davitt • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
Snow: White; White: Snow • Erin Robinson • Liminality 18
The Space of One Paragraph • Mark McCutcheon • Riddled with Arrows 2.2
The Stars Are Not Eternal • Kendall Evans & David C. Kopaska-Merkel • Entanglement (diminuendo press)
Third-Floor Bookstore • Herb Kauderer • Altered Reality Magazine 12
Thirteen Ways Of Looking At A Monster • Bruce Boston • Birthing Monsters: Frankenstein’s Cabinet of Curiosities and Cruelties (Firbolg Publishing)
Two Dozen Restaurant Concepts for a Gentrified Mixed-Use Vacancy • James Ebersole • The Cockroach Conservatory Vol 1: The Working Zealot’s Guide to Gaining Capital in Pre-Apocalyptic America
Ursula LeGuin in the Underworld • Sarah Tolmie • On Spec: The Canadian Magazine of the Fantastic, April
Verdant • F. J. Bergmann • Dreams and Nightmares 110
The Visionary • Ian Futter • Spectral Realms 9
White Siege • Alessandro Manzetti & Marge Simon • War (Crystal Lake Publishing)
The Witch’s House • Jeana Jorgenson • Liminality 15

David C. Kopaska-Merkel is the 2019 Rhysling Chair. He edited Star*Line in the late ’90s and later served as SFPA President. His 29th book, the speculative-poetry collection Metastable Systems, was nominated for the Elgin award. He edits and publishes Dreams and Nightmares, a genre poetry zine in its 33rd year of publication. In 2017 he was named an SFPA Grandmaster.

Call For 2019 Rhysling Award Nominations

The Science Fiction Poetry Association members have until February 15 to nominate eligible poems for addition to the Rhysling Award longlist.

Poems already recommended are listed here. (More will be added as nominations come in.)

The Rhyslings were first established in 1978, named for the blind poet Rhysling in Robert A. Heinlein’s short story “The Green Hills of Earth.” Rhysling’s skills were said to rival Rudyard Kipling’s. In real life, Apollo 15 astronauts named a crater near their landing site “Rhysling,” which has since become its official name. Winning works are regularly reprinted in the Nebula Awards Anthology from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Rhysling Awards are considered in the speculative literature field to be the poetry equivalent of the awards given for prose— achievement awards given to poets by the writing peers of their own field of literature.

David C. Kopaska-Merkel is the 2019 Rhysling Award chair.

Pixel Scroll 7/5/18 Trigger Scrollfile – Pixelman

(1) AVENGERS REASSEMBLE. The Society of Illustrators in New York will display “The Art of The Avengers and Other Heroes” from July 5 through October 20.

The Museum of Illustration at the Society of Illustrators is pleased to present an exhibition of original artwork showcasing characters from the Marvel Universe featuring the Avengers and other heroes. Artists include John Buscema, John Cassaday, Don Heck, Joe Jusko, Jack Kirby, George Perez, John Romita, Marie Severin, Walt Simonson, Barry Windsor Smith, Jim Steranko, Herbe Trimpe, and others, on display from July 5th through October 20, 2018.

The exhibition includes vintage, original comic artwork from all years of Marvel Comics history. The selections illustrate how Marvel’s innovative creative teams initially led by legendary creators Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, kept the Marvel Universe evolving with the times.

(2) B&N EXEC GONE, BUT WHY? On July 3, Barnes and Noble announced it had fired CEO Demos Parneros for unspecified policy violations, adding that he would not receive any severance package. Publisher’s Weekly has the story.

In a brief statement released late Tuesday afternoon, the retailer said CEO Demos Parneros was terminated for “violations of the Company’s policies.” While not saying what policies Parneros violated, B&N said his termination “is not due to any disagreement with the Company regarding its financial reporting, policies, or practices or any potential fraud relating thereto.” In addition to being fired immediately, Parneros will not receive any severance, B&N said. B&N said Parneros’s removal was undertaken by its board of directors, who were advised by the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP.

(3) CAUTION, I BRAKE FOR SINGULARITIES. When Daniel P. Dern read that “SpaceX delivers AI robot, ice cream, mice to space station” he immediately thought, “Boy, that sounds like a ‘what could possibly go wrong?’ tv episode waiting to happen…”

The International Space Station got its first robot with artificial intelligence Monday, along with some berries, ice cream and identical brown mice.

SpaceX’s capsule reached the station three days after launching from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Station astronaut Ricky Arnold used a large mechanical arm to grab the Dragon capsule as the spacecraft soared above Quebec, Canada.

The nearly 6,000-pound (2,700-kilogram) delivery includes the round robot Cimon, pronounced Simon. Slightly bigger than a basketball, the AI robot from the German Space Agency is meant to assist German astronaut Alexander Gerst with science experiments. Cimon’s brain will constantly be updated by IBM so its intelligence — and role — keep growing.

(4) SMOFS ON THE AIR.  Bids for future Westercons, Worldcons, and NASFiCs gave presentations and answered questions at Westercon 71 in Denver on July 5.

Kevin Standlee sent a link to the YouTube playlist of videos where you can watch the appearances of representatives from the SeaTac in 2020 Westercon, Utah in 2019 NASFiC, New Zealand in 2020 Worldcon, and DC in 2021 Worldcon bids.

(5) RHYSLING AWARD FOLLOW-UP. In the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association press release about the winners of the 2018 Rhysling Awards, SFPA President Bryan Thao Worra said:

My deep and personal congratulations to all of the winners and all of the nominees. The SFPA thanks everyone who nominated these poets and those who took the time to vote this year. Every year the awards are filled with great excitement, even as it is often deeply challenging to choose the best poem among so many styles and talented voices from around the world.

We’re looking forward to many more decades ahead of our members celebrating profound possibility, inquiry and imagination through verse.

First established in 1978, the Rhysling Award is now in its 40th year. Science Fiction fans may recognize the name. The Rhyslings were named for the blind poet Rhysling in Robert A. Heinlein’s short story “The Green Hills of Earth.” Rhysling’s skills were said to rival Rudyard Kipling’s. In real life, Apollo 15 astronauts named a crater near their landing site “Rhysling,” which has since become its official name.

The Rhysling Awards will be formally presented at DiversiCon 26 on Saturday, July 28th at 3:00pm in St. Paul (Bandana Square Best Western) by SFPA President, Bryan Thao Worra and other members of the SFPA executive committee. All members of the SF community are welcome to attend the ceremony. For scheduling at updates, visit www.diversicon.org.

(6) CALLING DESMOND MORRIS. How did Bambi’s distant ancestors bite the dust? Ars Technica turns to the professionals for an answer: “Archaeologists armed with spears demonstrate how Neanderthals hunted”.

Pleistocene CSI

At the Neumark-Nord site in Germany, Neanderthals 120,000 years ago hunted along the shores of a lake surrounded by dense forest. It’s a tough environment to make a living in, even for modern hunter-gatherers.  Here, archaeologists found two textbook examples of hunting-spear trauma. A fallow deer vertebra bore a circular wound from what Gaudzinski-Windheuser and her colleagues described as “a well-placed lethal injury” to the deer’s neck, not far from the trachea—probably from a spear thrust.

A pelvic bone from another fallow deer had a circular hole punched through the thinnest part of the bone, toward the front and close to the spine. The bone hadn’t begun to heal, so the injury, although likely not fatal in its own right, probably happened in the moments before death.

In micro-CT images, Gaudzinski-Windheuser and her colleagues could see that the wound had a tapered shape, wider on the outer face of the bone where the spear had entered. This pushed bone fragments inward, but things were narrower on the inner surface where the spear tip had come out the other side and pushed bone fragments outward. Such a clear injury is a rare find, and it offered Gaudzinski-Windheuser and her colleagues a chance to analyze Neanderthal hunting methods in detail.

(7) AND HAVING WRIT, MOVES ON. Someone corrected this blue plaque in Cambridge.

(8) COMICS SECTION.

  • Mike Kennedy learned from Basic Instructions (a rerun from 2011) how to bring science fiction characters back to life.

(9) FLIPSIDE. At Galactic Journey The Traveler fills in some missing info about his friend the Australian computer: “[July 4, 1963] Down Under to the Worlds of Men (Woomera, Part 2)”.

A few months ago I wrote about my friend Mary Whitehead, who works as an Experimental Officer in Australia. She recently wrote me back with some corrections, that I will pass on to you, in order not to mar the historical record.

For example, I said that Mary lived at Woomera, which was not the case. I was conflating the rocket testing range with the place where most of the computing work got done. She actually lives near the Weapons Research Establishment (WRE), which is located in Salisbury, a small town about 15 miles north of the big city of Adelaide. Woomera Rocket Range is in the isolated outback another 300 miles north of that.

In 1949, Mary, who studied mathematics in college, got a job in the Bomb Ballistics Section of the WRE. At that time, Mary was the only professional woman at Salisbury. Her first work was to lead a team of female Computers. At first, they used mechanical calculators like the noisy Friden’s and then Marchant’s like we used at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

(10) HE’S MAD. In “A new editor. A new home. But Mad magazine still takes sharp aim at Trump and Roseanne”, the Washington Post’s Michael Cavna interviews MAD editor Bill Morrison, formerly with Bongo Comics, about how he is keeping his magazine fresh and topical after it moved to Los Angeles last year.

“We wanted to come up with a ‘summer fun’ cover and looked to things like beach parties, county fairs and amusement arcades for inspiration,” Morrison says of the cover illustrated by Mark Fredrickson. “Art director Suzy Hutchinson thought an image of [Mad mascot] Alfred playing Whac-A-Mole would be fun, and mocked up a surreal cover of Alfred whacking mini-versions of himself.

“Then,” the editor says, “we turned on the news and decided that taking a whack at some notorious celebrities would be not only fun, but therapeutic.”

(11) LITIGATION. Don Quixote is feeling better. “Terry Gilliam: Legal Battle Over ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Won’t Stop Film’s Release”The Hollywood Reporter has the story.

Terry Gilliam says the legal battle over the rights to The Man Who Killed Don Quixote will not prevent the film’s long-awaited release.

Nearly a quarter of a century in the making, the film that premiered at Cannes and screened out of competition Wednesday at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival in the Czech Republic, has been dogged with challenges worthy of Cervante’s noble hero.

After false starts and many rewrites, ex-Monty Python member Gilliam finally completed the film only for a legal dispute with a now former Portuguese producer Paolo Branco to threaten to derail it.

Branco’s threats were sufficient for Amazon to pull out of a deal that would have ensured a 90-day cinematic release in the U.S. before it was available for streaming. Even Cannes chief Jerome Paillard was rumored to have had the jitters before its festival screening in May.

But that decision, Karlovy Vary’s screening and an upcoming competition screening at the Munich film festival appear to have strengthened the French distributors Kinology’s hand, despite a Paris court ruling last month granting the film’s rights to Branco.

“It is about to be released broadly in Holland and Belgium,” Gilliam told The Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday. “I think Cannes changed things. Paolo just went too far – ‘I will tell the festival not to show it’… It seems things are floating along nicely, although he did scare a lot of people away at one point.”

(12) NOT CANALS, BUT… From Nature: “Mars’s river valleys whisper of a rainy past”.

Fast-flowing waterways on ancient Mars carved river valleys much like those on modern Earth.

Although Mars is cold and dry today, channels on its surface look as if running water shaped them, leading researchers to think the planet was warm and wet in the past. But scientists have struggled to determine whether that water fell from the sky as rain or seeped upward from the ground.

To discern the water’s source, Hansjoerg Seybold at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich and his colleagues analysed the geometry of Martian valley channels. The channels branch off at relatively narrow angles, as do waterways in arid landscapes on Earth, such as the US Southwest. More-humid landscapes with a lot of groundwater — the Amazon rainforest, for example — host river channels that branch at wider angles.

(13) BELATED BIRTHDAY. Born on the Fourth of July – no, not George M. Cohan. ScreenRant celebrated with its post: “Today is MCU Captain America’s 100th Birthday”.

We know Cap’s exact date of birth thanks to a scene early on in Captain America: The First Avenger, when pre-serum Steve Rogers attempts (not for the first time) to sign up for the army. The doctor dismisses him due to his long list of ailments, and in the process gives the audience a look at his medical records, which include his date of birth. Naturally, he was born on Independence Day.

The comic book version of Captain America, meanwhile, is actually 101 years old, having been born on July 4, 1917. His birth date is often incorrectly cited as being July 4, 1920, since that’s the date given on his Wikipedia page. However, The Adventures of Captain America #1 (the source for Wikipedia’s claim) states that he was born in 1917.

(14) JULY 4TH LEFTOVERS. NPR’s astronomical salute to the holiday: “LOOK: Hot, Young Stars Form ‘Celestial Fireworks'”.

If you squint, the image above bears a pretty strong resemblance to what you might see at a July 4 fireworks display.

But it’s actually, dare we say, far cooler. Or hotter: The image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope is a cluster of “huge, hot” stars called NGC 3603, about 20,000 light years away in the constellation Carina.

The glittery image was captured in 2009, and NASA posted it on its website on the eve of today’s Independence Day celebrations. The swirling purple clouds of gas and dust, it says, are the “raw material for new star formation.”

(15) DISSERTATION DEFENDER. Congratulations to Shaun Duke, of Skiffy and Fanty, who earned his Doctorate today.

[Thanks to Carl Slaughter, Andrew Porter, Cat Eldridge, ULTRAGOTHA, SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie, Martin Morse Wooster, Mike Kennedy, Chip Hitchock, JJ, Daniel P. Dern, Steven H Silver, Eric Franklin, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Ingvar.]

2018 Rhysling Awards

Mary Soon Lee and Neil Gaiman are the winners of the 2018 Rhysling Awards presented by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA).

The winners were chosen by SFPA members, with 140 votes cast in the short poem category, and 93 in the long poem category.

Short Poem Category

First Place
“Advice to a Six-Year-Old”
Mary Soon Lee • Star*Line 40.2

Second Place
“How to Grieve: A Primer for Witches”
Sara Cleto • Mythic Delirium, May

Third Place
“Gramarye”
F. J. Bergmann • Polu Texni 12/26/17

Long Poem Category

First Place
“The Mushroom Hunters”
Neil Gaiman • Brainpickings 4/26/17

Second Place
“For Preserves”
Cassandra Rose Clarke • Star*Line 40.4

Third Place
“Alternate Genders”
Mary Soon Lee • Mithila Review 9

The 2018 Rhysling Anthology can be ordered through the SFPA website. The editor and 2018 contest chair is Linda D. Addison. The book design is by F.J. Bergmann, Cover image is “Dark Mermaid” by Rowena Morrill.

[Thanks to Mark Hepworth for the story.]

2018 Rhysling Award Finalists

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has finalized its 2018 Rhysling Award candidates, reports the group’s publication StarLine 41.2. Ninety-three members voted.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words.

SFPA members have until June 15 to vote on the winners.

Short Poems (87 poems)
“Advice to a Six-Year-Old” • Mary Soon Lee • Star*Line 40.2
“After Midnight” • David Clink • Compostela: Tesseracts Twenty eds. Spider Robinson & James Alan Gardner (Edge, 2017)
“The Alchemy of Arsenic” • Neile Graham • Liminality 13
“All-Purpose Spell for Banishment” • Lesley Wheeler • Salamander 45
“An Announcement” • Sara Cleto & Brittany Warman • Uncanny 19
“Apologies from the Moon” • Lynne Sargent • Wild Musette: The Sin Eater
“Astro-Archaeologist’s Log” • Vince Gotera • The Poet’s Haven Digest: Strange Land
“The Astronaut Nightmare” • Michael H. Hanson • When the Night Owl Screams (MoonDream Press, 2017)
“Astronomers” • Ace G. Pilkington • The Horror Zine, November
“Baalberith” • Robert Beveridge • Priestess & Hierophant 2
“Baba Yaga: Her Almost Origin Story” • Minadora Macheret • Bramble & Thorn, ed. Nicci Mechler (Porkbelly Press)
“Beware” • Juleigh Howard-Hobson • Songs of Eretz Poetry Review 22/9/17
“Birth, Place” • Brandon O’Brien • Uncanny 18
“Black Star” • Adam Bolivar • The Lay of Old Hex (Hippocampus Press)
“Circe’s Guests” • Amelia Gorman • Liminality 12
“Cosmovore Searches the Animal Shelter” • Kristi Carter • Cosmovore (Aqueduct Press)
“Dark Solstice Cold and Deathly” • Richard L. Tierney • Spectral Realms 6
“The Dead Boy Teaches Me About Godzilla” • Lana Hechtman Ayers • Escape into Life
“Dead Bride Philosophy” • Sara Tantlinger • Space & Time 128
“The Dead Languages of the Wind” • David Clink • Compostela: Tesseracts Twenty eds. Spider Robinson & James Alan Gardner (Edge, 2017)
“Dear Shotgun City” • Holly Lyn Walrath • Eye to the Telescope 25
“The Devil in Boston” • A. J. Odasso • Barking Sycamores 12
“early years of transdimensional travel” • John Reinhart • New Myths 38
“Egress” • Marge Simon • Star*Line 40.4
“The Empty House” • A. J. Locke • Sycorax’s Daughters, eds. Kinitra Brooks, Linda D. Addison & Susana Morris (Cedar Grove Publishing)
“End-Times Tables” • Margarita Tenser • Star*Line 40.1
“Endeavour” • G. O. Clark • Asimov’s SF, May/June
“Enthusiasts of Ruin” • Margaret Wack • Liminality 14
“first date” • David F. Shultz •  The Literary Hatchet 18
“Flowers for Asimov” • William Shaw • Star*Line 40.4
“Giger’s Children” • Saba Syed Razvi • Machine Dreams 1
“Goodnight” • David F. Shultz • Polar Borealis Magazine 4
“Gramarye” • F. J. Bergmann • Polu Texni 12/26/17
“Grand Guignol” • G. O. Clark • Longshot Island 12/19/17
“Guttersnipe” • WC Roberts • Chrome Baby 63
“How to Grieve: A Primer for Witches” • Sara Cleto • Mythic Delirium, May
“Hubble’s Constant” • Marian D. Moore • Asimov’s SF, January/February
“In the Business of Things That Don’t Earn You Much” • Ziad Gadou • Strange Horizons, Arab League community and diaspora special issue
“late to work” • Julie Bloss Kelsey • Jersey Devil Press 91
“The Lovers and the Labyrinth” • Sara Cleto • Faerie Magazine 41
“Lycium Barbarum” • PS Cottier • Umbel & Panicle 5
“March Madness” • Francis W. Alexander • Night to Dawn, April
“Medusa in Her Mirror” • Hillary Lyon • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
“Messiaen Among The Dinosaurs” • Tim Jones • takah? 89
“Midwest Wonder Expo” • Amelia Gorman • Star*Line 40.4
“The Mushroom Siren” K. A. Opperman • The Audient Void 4
“The Mutant Rat” • K. V. Volney • krystalvolneyfanclub.blogspot.com
“My Little Green Secret” • Clay F. Johnson • Horror Writers Association Poetry Showcase 4
“My Response to Your Mayday Call” • David Clink & Herb Kauderer • Dreams and Nightmares 105
“A Net to Snare a Unicorn” • Beth Cato • Mythic Delirium, January
“O Terrible Bird” • Sandra Kasturi • Black Feathers: Dark Avian Tales, ed. Ellen Datlow (Pegasus Books)
“One More Attempt at Disaster Preparedness” • Jeannine Hall Gailey • American Poetry Journal
“Other People’s Tragedies” • Jennifer Crow • Mythic Delirium, August
“Pine Song, Robin Song, Star Song” • Holly Lyn Walrath • Liminality 11
“Pleiades”• Jenny Blackford • The Loyalty of Chickens, Pitt Street Poetry
“Poisoned Apple” • Ann Thornfield-Long • Abyss & Apex, March
“Quantum Socks” • R. Gene Turchin • Eye to the Telescope 25
“Radiant Things” • A. J. Odasso • Noble Dissent (ed. Rebecca Jane Bilkau, Beautiful Dragons Press)
“reanimated …” • Susan Burch • Scifaikuest, print
“Save Our Souls” • Karen Bovenmyer • Silver Blade 33
“scent of blackened” • Greer Woodward • Star*Line 40.1
“The Scratch inside Your Chest” • Layla Al-Bedawi • Strange Horizons 10/30/17
“Scorpio” • Jo Walton • Patreon 11/23/17
“Sea Legs” • Milo Gallagher • NonBinary Review 14
“Secret Identities” • Davian Aw • Strange Horizons 2/6/17
“Shadowfolk” • John Philip Johnson • Devilfish Review 19
“She traveled back in time” • Terrie Leigh Relf • Outposts of Beyond, April
“Small Town Witches” • Kate Pentecost • Liminality 13
“Some Things Never Change” • Alan Ira Gordon • Star*Line 40.1
“Song of a Changeling” • Adele Gardner • Balticon 51: The BSFAN, May
“Starlight” • Christina Sng • Space & Time 129
“A Streetcar Named Happily Ever After” • B. J. Lee • Illumen, Autumn
“Supper with the Sphinx” • Carolyn Clink • Canadian Ginger (ed. Kim Clark & Dawn Marie Kresan, Oolichan Books, 2017)
“Surreal Bucket List #3” • Bruce Boston • Mithila Review 9
“Sycorax’s Daughters Unveiled” • Linda Addison • Sycorax’s Daughters, eds. Kinitra Brooks, Linda D. Addison & Susana Morris (Cedar Grove Publishing)
“Syncing Minefields” • Karen Bovenmyer • Strange Horizons 2/20/17
“Table of Contents from a Lost Book of Divination” • Dean Kostos • Star*Line 40.2
“The Talking River” • John W. Sexton • Star*Line 40.2
“Titan’s Magic Islands: Transient Features in the Hydrocarbon Seas” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August
“Vaginoplasticine” • Alison Rumfitt • Star*Line 40.4
“Vampirette” • Kathleen A. Lawrence • Star*Line 40.4
“Villain L” • Azriel Johnson • The Poet’s Haven Digest: The Distance Between Insanity and Genius
“Vul Ravin” • D. L. Myers • Spectral Realms 6
“Wayfaring King” • Beth Cato • Star*Line 40.4
“When the Aliens Come to Tea” • Mary A. Turzillo • The Poet’s Haven Digest: Strange Land
“The Witch Woman” • Alexandra Seidel • Polu Texni 7/17/17
“Yellow Spiders” • John C. Mannone • Altered Reality Magazine 4/28/17

 

Long Poems (63 poems)
“Alternate Genders” • Mary Soon Lee • Mithila Review 9
“The Android Who Gave Herself Away” Rohinton Daruwala • Eye to the Telescope 23
“Apocalyptic Mass” • Alessandro Manzetti • No Mercy (Crystal Lake Publications)
“Atop the Crystal Moon” • Ashley Dioses • Diary of a Sorceress (Hippocampus Press)
“The Ballad of the de la Poers” • Adam Bolivar • Spectral Realms 7
“Castaway” • John C. Mannone • Anak Sastra 28
“Chrysopoeia & Isagoge” • Saba Syed Razvi • Beside the Muezzin’s Call & Beyond the Harem’s Veil (Finishing Line Press)
“A Cleaner Times Square” • Vanessa Kittle• Chrome Baby 61
“Commentary Track” • Troy Jollimore • The Plume Anthology of Poetry 5 ed. Daniel Lawless (Plume Editions)
“Dab3 (Mount Hermon, 1998)” • Sara Saab • Strange Horizons 10/30/17
“Daunted” • Mary Soon Lee • Dreams and Nightmares 105
“Don’t Forget the Tinderbox” • Jennifer Lynn Krohn • NonBinary Review 14
“A Dream of Milk and Blood” • Alessandro Manzetti • No Mercy (Crystal Lake Publications)
“The Drum Star (Orion’s Ghost)” • Ryu Ando • Strange Horizons, Fund Drive Special
“The First Battle of the Puffer War” • Herb Kauderer • Outposts of Beyond, July
“For Preserves” • Cassandra Rose Clarke • Star*Line 40.4
“Four Moons” • John Philip Johnson • Mithila Review 9
“Frida’s Monsters” • Alessandro Manzetti • No Mercy (Crystal Lake Publications)
“Ghosts of 1816” • Clay F. Johnson • Spectral Realms 6
“The Hawthorn Muses” • Shannon Connor Winward • Timeless Tales 8
“Hot” • Cislyn Smith • Strange Horizons 5/29/17
“The Huntsman” • Lora Gray • Liminal Stories 4
“In the Labyrinth” • Allan Rozinski • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
“Instructions for Astronauts” • Michael Janairo • Mithila Review 8
“Just Rosie” • Kathleen A. Lawrence • Eye to the Telescope 23
“Kindred Spirit” • F. J. Bergmann • Dreams and Nightmares 106
“Let Me In” • Tonya Liburd • Alligators in the Sewers (Unnerving Magazine chapbook)
“Little Red” •  Christina Sng • Polu Texni 9/4/17
“Little Red: Morning” • Sally Rosen Kindred • Bramble & Thorn, ed. Nicci Mechler (Porkbelly Press)
“Looking Back to the Stars” • Vince Gotera • Altered Reality Magazine, October
“Lotus Moon” • Mary Soon Lee • Mythic Delirium 4.2
“Maintenance Call” • Ken Poyner • Abyss & Apex 61
“Masques and Mayhem” • Jennifer Crow • Mythic Delirium, September
“Moonlight in the Playground” • Christina Sng • Spectral Realms 6
“The Mushroom Hunters” • Neil Gaiman • Brainpickings 4/26/17
“O Ippos” • Mari Ness • Through Immortal Shadows Singing (Papaveria Press)
“On a Dreamland’s Moon” • Ashley Dioses • Black Wings VI (PS Publishing)
“Opposition Night” • Christina M. Rau • Liberating the Astronauts (Aqueduct Press)
“The Patron Saint of Lost Causes” • Chris Castro-Rappl •  Abyss & Apex, September
“Pre-Raphaelite Girls” • Delbert R. Gardner & Adele Gardner • Buckshot Magazine, 7/12/17
“Protestations Against the Idea of Anglicization” • Cassandra Khaw • Uncanny 19
“Quietly, on the way to Mars” • Bronwyn Lovell • Cordite Poetry Review, September
“The Rain that Falls in the Mutant Rain Forest” • Bruce Boston • Visions of the Mutant Rain Forest (Crystal Lake Publications)
“Rapunzel and Medusa” • Colleen Anderson • Polu Texni 9/25/17
“The Raven’s Hallowe’en” • Shannon Connor Winward • Wild Musette, 10/26/18
“Romance of Possible Contrasts” • Alison Rumfitt • Strange Horizons, 12/18/17
“The Seal Wife” • Signe Pike• Faerie Magazine 38
“The Secret Life of a Toaster” • Mary Soon Lee • Polu Texni 10/2/17
“Shards of a Fractured Soul” • Deborah L. Davitt • The Poet’s Haven Digest: Strange Land
“She Dreams of Tigers, or Remembers” • Jennifer D’Aubergny • The Poet’s Haven Digest: The Distance Between Insanity and Genius
“The Simple Poem” • Abhishek Sengupta • Liminality 12
“Signs That the World Might Be Ending” •  E. E. King • NonBinary Review 13
“Size 15W Should Do It (after George Orwell” • Tyree Campbell • A Danger to Self and Others (Alban Lake)
“Sons of Fire and Clay” • Jesse Parent• The Poet’s Haven Digest: The Distance Between Insanity and Genius
“Starskin, Sealskin” • Shveta Thakrar & Sara Cleto • Uncanny 17
“The Story of Shen Dho, A Pirate in the Red Flag Fleet, Who Serves Ching Shih Devotedly for Many Years” • Kendall Evans • Illumen, Autumn
“tha may ask thee sen/At the Finish” • Paul Brookes • Eternal Haunted Summer, Summer Solstice
“The Trajectory of Culture” • David C. Kopaska-Merkel & Kendall Evans • Polu Texni 5/15/17
“The Tree Builder” • Christina Loraine • Eye to the Telescope 25
“Waking” • Sara Cleto & Brittany Warman • Liminality 10
“What Neighbors Do” • Herb Kauderer • 49th Parallels, ed. Hayden Trenholm (Bundoran Press)
“Whispers & Lies” • Deborah Elizabeth Whaley • Sycorax’s Daughters, eds. Kinitra Brooks, Linda D. Addison & Susana Morris (Cedar Grove Publishing)
“The Woman in the Feathered Mask” • K. A. Opperman • Skelos 3

Call For 2018 Rhysling Award Nominations

The Science Fiction Poetry Association members have until February 15 to nominate eligible poems for addition to the Rhysling Award longlist.

Poems already recommended are listed here. (None at this writing; keep checking back.)

The Rhyslings were first established in 1978, named for the blind poet Rhysling in Robert A. Heinlein’s short story “The Green Hills of Earth.” Rhysling’s skills were said to rival Rudyard Kipling’s. In real life, Apollo 15 astronauts named a crater near their landing site “Rhysling,” which has since become its official name. Winning works are regularly reprinted in the Nebula Awards Anthology from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Rhysling Awards are considered in the speculative literature field to be the poetry equivalent of the awards given for prose— achievement awards given to poets by the writing peers of their own field of literature.

Linda D. Addison is the 2018 Rhysling Award chair.